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1619

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1619

The New York Times

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In August of 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. America was not yet America, but this was the moment it began. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed. On the 400th anniversary of this fateful moment, it is time to tell the story. “1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619pod ...
 
1619 & 1776 explores the common ground between American Christians on the left and the right. In each episode, I listen to pastors, priests, ministers, and preachers talk about what the last few years have been like for them, what they see as the core of our faith, and how we can come together in unity in the church today. Join me while we build bridges across the chasms that divide us.
 
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All interviews for season one have aired; only the season finale is left--but it's time for your voices! Literally. I want to know what thoughts you have about the topics I've covered and the things my guests have said. What is your relationship with American Christianity (if you care to share)? How would you express is the core of Christianity? Wh…
 
Rev. Aaron Williams is Associate Pastor of Pastoral Ministries & Kindred Community at University Presbyterian Church in Seattle, Washington. Aaron has been preaching and teaching the gospel for 30 years. He was born in Augusta, Georgia. He’s a graduate of Dallas Theological Seminary, and prior to coming to UPC, he served as the Senior Pastor of Mou…
 
Now that we are about halfway through the season, we thought it would be a good time to pause and reflect on what we have heard so far. Therefore, in this episode we turn the tables and interview the interviewer. The Producer, Christopher Bartlett, talks to Sørina Higgins about what agreements she's heard among her guests and whether she's optimist…
 
Rev. Barshinger, a military chaplain and Orthodox Presbyterian minister, offers encouragement that Christians should be people who are equipped to understand each other and bridge some divisions. We need to remember that we are all hurting and be gentle to one another, but also learn to deal better with nuance and subtlety.…
 
American Christianity is falling apart. In this first episode, Sørina Higgins talks about the terrible schisms in the church today, what approach she'll be taking to interviewing pastors about Christian re-unification, why she's the one doing this project, what the title means, and more. Join her to build bridges across the chasms that divide us.…
 
The Provosts, a family of sugar-cane farmers in Louisiana, had worked the same land for generations. When it became harder and harder to keep hold of that land, June Provost and his wife, Angie, didn’t know why — and then a phone call changed their understanding of everything. In the finale of “1619,” we hear the rest of June and Angie’s story, and…
 
More than a century and a half after the promise of 40 acres and a mule, the story of black land ownership in America remains one of loss and dispossession. June and Angie Provost, who trace their family line to the enslaved workers on Louisiana’s sugar-cane plantations, know this story well. On today’s episode: The Provosts spoke with Adizah Eghan…
 
Black Americans were denied access to doctors and hospitals for decades. From the shadows of this exclusion, they pushed to create the nation’s first federal health care programs. On today’s episode: Jeneen Interlandi, a member of The New York Times’s editorial board and a writer for The Times Magazine, and Yaa Gyasi, the author of “Homegoing.” “16…
 
Black music, forged in captivity, became the sound of complete artistic freedom. It also became the sound of America. On today’s episode: Wesley Morris, a critic-at-large for The New York Times. “1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast. This episode cont…
 
The institution of slavery turned a poor, fledgling nation into a financial powerhouse, and the cotton plantation was America’s first big business. Behind the system, and built into it, was the whip. On today’s episode: Matthew Desmond, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and the author of “Evicted,” and Jesmyn Ward, the author of…
 
In August of 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. America was not yet America, but this was the moment it began. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed. On the 400th anniversary of this fateful moment, it is time to te…
 
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