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When the only way to discover who you are means you have to enter into the badlands, you break the rules. In our INTO THE BADLANDS AFTER SHOW we discuss the trials Sunny and Veil must go through in order to learn more about Sunny’s past. Tune in here for reviews, recaps and in-depth discussions of the latest episodes, as well as the insider scoop from cast and crew members on the show.
 
Ernesto Gutierrez Jr. was born in McAllen, Texas in 1971 and he is a third-generation Trucker with a passion for trucking. Ernesto enjoys driving a truck! It is his life and his passion. He also enjoys helping truckers with the resources to help them succeed. Ernesto remembers back in the early 60s and 70s when he used to ride along with his dad in his cabover. They enjoyed many trips together. He taught Ernesto a lot in his young life.
 
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show series
 
In this episode, we try to understand why it is that Twitter seems to be so awful, and can be so easily weaponized to destroy someone's reputation or career. We focus on a proposal from C. Thi Nguyen (University of Utah), who argues that one of the major problems with Twitter is that it gamifies communication, and in so doing, it warps the purposes…
 
Former Trump official John Ratcliffe (National Intelligence Director) recently suggested that there would be reports from the government that suggest the presence of alien spacecraft on Earth. Some members of the public, in response to this, have come to believe in alien visitation less. When would it be rational to believe that unexplained observa…
 
In this episode, we discuss the idea that a significant portion of the population is being irrational, or "detached from reality", when it comes to politics. What does it mean to be irrational, and what are different ways that one could be irrational? Toby Napoletano, Michael Hughes
 
In this episode, we take a look at the second (and more famous) red scare, led by Joseph McCarthy. What were the conditions that led to that scare, and how did it end? What parallels and lessons can we draw for today's political hysteria, spearheaded by Trump? Toby Napoletano, Michael Hughes
 
In today's episode, we discuss the history and legacy of the first red scare, just after World War I. What were the forces that led to the anti-leftist hysteria and political persecution of people that were thought of as Communist sympathizers? And how did the first red scare lay the groundwork for future red-baiting of progressives? Can we learn a…
 
In today's episode, we begin to take stock of the frightening state of American democracy, where it is good news that the sitting president probably won't steal an election. Why is the situation so dire? How did we get here? What do we do going forward, and can we come back from this? We focus on the epistemic estrangement of liberals and conservat…
 
In today's episode, we begin to take stock of the frightening state of American democracy, where it is good news that the sitting president probably won't steal an election. Why is the situation so dire? How did we get here? What do we do going forward, and can we come back from this? Two of the main ingredients to the problem that we discuss in th…
 
In this episode, we discuss the Supreme Court's decisions to allow or prohibit various extensions to the deadlines for mail-in ballots in the 2020 presidential election. In particular, we focus on Justice Kavanaugh's decision to prohibit a six-day extension on the receipt of mail-in ballots in Wisconsin, and Justice Kagan's dissenting opinion. What…
 
In this episode, we discuss Hannah Arendt's classic Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report On the Banality of Evil. We discuss the sometimes surprising psychological underpinnings of evil, and the way that evil flourishes in the absence of thought. We also discuss some of the lessons that can be drawn from Arendt's discussion of Eichmann. Toby Napoletano,…
 
In today's episode, we discuss the recent report from Mike Pompeo's Commission on Unalienable Rights. We go through the document which, unfortunately, is largely self-congratulatory and intellectually vacuous, and discuss the relationship of the United States to the human rights project. Toby Napoletano, Michael Hughes…
 
In today's episode, we continue our discussion of the Bostock vs. Clayton County, Georgia Supreme Court case, which, in a surprise decision, extended Title VII of the Civil Rights act to protect gay, lesbian, and transgender people against employment discrimination. This time, we focus on some of the more confusing aspects of Alito's dissent. Toby …
 
In today's episode, we begin our discussion of the Bostock vs. Clayton County, Georgia Supreme Court case, which, in a surprise decision, extended Title VII of the Civil Rights act to protect gay, lesbian, and transgender people against employment discrimination. We explain the decision, give some of the historical background, and discuss some of A…
 
In this episode, we finish our discussion of the ethics of protest, and of whether or not violence in protest can be justified. Can thinking about the ethics of war help us understand whether violence in protest can be justified? Does the preservation of one's dignity sometimes require people to engage in acts of destruction? We also discuss the di…
 
In this episode, we begin our discussion of the ethics of protest, and of whether or not violence in protest can be justified. In the first part, we ask about the nature of protest itself, and discuss some of the sociology concerning the public's perception of protest, particularly as it relates the protests against police brutality against black A…
 
In this episode, we chat with Arthur Lieber about his recent book Political Introverts (How Empathetic Voters Can Help Save American Politics). Lieber explains how a significant, introverted portion of the electorate is turned off by the loudness and boastfulness of our politics. If politics can be made more slower and more thoughtful, he argues, t…
 
In today's episode, we discuss the ways in which economic inequality interacts makes a pandemic worse. As usual, the economically vulnerable are likely to suffer more, and in this case, the presence of economically vulnerable populations makes it harder to combat. Toby Napoletano, Michael Hughes, Hanna Gunn…
 
In this episode, we continue our discussion of the coronavirus pandemic, focusing on the difficulties in weighing up the health and economic costs, and how this complicates figuring out what to do. Toby Napoletano, Michael Hughes, Hanna GunnDi The Badlands
 
In today's episode, we begin our discussion on the coronavirus pandemic, focusing specifically on the epistemic challenges that face us as we try to figure out what to do, and the epistemic blunders that helped get us where we are. We will be talking about the challenges of balancing health risks and economic risks, and then the ways that inequalit…
 
In this episode, we address some of the common (sometimes outlandish) anti-Sanders narratives that have been ubiquitous in recent weeks, especially as it looked like, briefly, he might be the front runner. Would Bernie get anything done as president? Is he electable? Is he a socialist? That and more. Toby Napoletano | Michael Hughes…
 
In this episode, we talk about the state of the Democratic primary, and the extraordinary influence of the tiny Iowa caucus on the process. Why does it have such an outsized influence? Should it? Is it unfair to other parts of the electorate? And are there ways to do it better?Di The Badlands
 
In this episode, we attempt a philosophical sketch of Joe Biden. In particular, we discuss how his general approach to politics and representation, which focuses on his individual qualities and experiences, rather than policy and underlying political principles, differs from progressives like Sanders and Warren. Toby Napoletano, Michael Hughes…
 
In this episode, we (half-seriously) debate the ethics of Christmas. Is Christmas, on the whole, a good thing or a bad thing? Does the uptick in charitable giving outweigh the explosion in consumption? Does Christmas ruin gift-giving? Does the fostering of community justify Christmas ham? Is the celebration of Christmas an act of cultural appropria…
 
In this episode, we talk to philosopher Robert Talisse about his new book Overdoing Democracy: Why We Must Put Politics in Its Place. Could it be that our politically polarized and oversaturated environment is undermining our democracy? How has this happened, and are there things that we can do to restore civic friendship and the conditions needed …
 
In this episode, we continue our discussion of property rights and investigate whether property rights can be justified as social rights. If they can, what standard do we appeal to in order to justify them? And to the extent that they are justified, just how strong should those rights be taken to be? Toby Napoletano, Michael Hughes…
 
As Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren propose wealth taxes on the super rich, there are bound to be complaints that such policies would violate a sacred right to property. In this episode, we explore the philosophical foundations of property rights. Is there a good natural rights justification of a right to property, or does that approach fall sho…
 
Ok, so if someone has a right to representation, they should have a right to participation. But who should be represented? Democratic principles suggest that it is “the governed”. But who is that? And does that lead us to thinking that probably everyone in the world should have some say over U.S. policy? Toby Napoletano, Michael Hughes…
 
In this episode, we ask: Is there any justification for denying the right to vote for non-citizen residents, assuming they have a right to political representation? After all, they are counted in the census for the purposes of apportioning political representatives, and yet, they are denied the right to vote. What gives? Toby Napoletano, Michael Hu…
 
In this episode, we challenge the conventional wisdom on both the right and left that it is obvious that we should deport immigrants who are violent criminals. As it turns out, it's not so obvious, because of the serious consequences this has for the communities that the criminals are deported back into, and also because of the historical role that…
 
In this episode, we continue our discussion of partisan gerrymandering. We consider the pros and cons of more proportional systems, and ask to what degree proportionality should be sacrificed in order to ensure minority representation. Toby Napoletano, Michael Hughes, Hanna GunnDi The Badlands
 
In this episode, we begin our discussion of partisan gerrymandering: what is it? How, exactly, does it happen, and why? What are the harms of it, and if it’s unfair, why is it unfair? Answering these questions forces us to grapple with the very goods that a representational democracy is meant to secure. Toby Napoletano, Michael Hughes, Hanna Gunn…
 
We continue our discussion of expert misinformation, focusing on the roles of publishers, the media, and the general public in the process. Do researchers and publishers put too much focus on the novel and the surprising? Does the general public share any of the epistemic blame, or are they put in an impossible epistemic position? Toby Napoletano, …
 
In this episode, we discuss the relationship between expert researchers, their funders, the media, and the general public, and the ways that relationship can go bad. In what ways can researchers and funders act wrongly, and what are the consequences for the general public? Should we do more to prevent conflicts of interest, and what are some of the…
 
We continue our philosophical profile of 2020 presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren by shifting to her views on the state of (and crises of) American democracy, and on foreign policy. What can we do about epistemic bubbles, the “revolving door”, and lobbyist misinformation? And what does a foreign policy which puts middle and working class Americ…
 
In this episode, we begin our philosophical profile of 2020 presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren. We start with her views on domestic economic policy. What are her deep economic values that drive her ideas? How does she conceive of the American Dream? How does her reading of American history drive her belief that the American Dream is dead? And …
 
In this episode, we are joined by Sarah Imran (director of policy and research, Nashville Human Relations Commission) to talk about the housing crisis that is unfolding in Nashville, Tennessee. How bad is the crisis and what causes housing crises? What are the broader harms of a housing crisis and why are communities of color disproportionately aff…
 
This week, we continue our discussion of the 2019 edition of the World Happiness Report. How has the rise in screen-time and social media contributed to the decrease in happiness in the U.S.? What are the effects of Big Data on well-being? Why is there so much addiction in the U.S. and how has it driven unhappiness? Toby Napoletano, Michael Hughes,…
 
This week, we start reviewing the 2019 edition of the World Happiness Report. How happy was the world in 2019? Which places are more happier than others and why? In what ways does subjective well-being affect political engagement and support of right-wing populism? And can volunteering and donating money make us happier? Toby Napoletano, Michael Hu…
 
In this episode, we conclude our discussion of workplace democracy. Are workplace democracies more productive than their capitalist counterparts? Can they compete in a capitalist system? Will they substantially shrink economic inequality? And how impactful will they be on our politics? Toby Napoletano, Michael Hughes…
 
In this episode, we get further into the details of Richard Wolff’s Democracy at Work: A Cure for Capitalism. First, what is a workplace democracy, and what do they look like? What are the moral benefits that accrue to workers in a workplace democracy? What about local communities? And are some of the limits of workplace democracies when it comes t…
 
In this episode, we talk about the college admissions scandal, and the underlying problems with admissions into prestigious universities. To what extent are the universities to blame for the scandal, and scandals aside, how meritocratic is the admissions process? Would we be better off if we just stopped attaching prestige to admission in these sch…
 
In this episode, we begin discussing Richard Wolff’s Democracy at Work: A Cure for Capitalism. Could it be that the deep problems of various kinds of capitalism stem from their undemocratic organization of the workplace? What is it to democratize the workplace? And what’s the connection between democratic practice in the economic sphere and in the …
 
Philosopher Suzy Killmister (Monash University) joins The Badlands to discuss the philosophical foundations of human rights. She argues that we have human rights not because of some inherent feature of human beings, but because of a special social status we now have as members of the human kind. She defends the idea that human rights are deeply mor…
 
This week, we wrap up our discussion on the philosophy of work. Would happiness be impossible for some people in a workless future? Does being hardworking make you deserving of resources? Is it a virtue, or is it maybe a vice? Is there a fine line between play and work? Toby Napoletano, Michael Hughes, Hanna Gunn…
 
This week, we talk about the ways in which work dominates our lives and our minds, and get into the details of our extremely vexed relationship with our work. Are the causes mostly internal, external, or both? How is the obsession with work potentially harmful? Is the ideal of work, ultimately, a good one to organize a society and value system arou…
 
Opponents of a basic income argue that a basic income would undermine the incentive to work. But is that a bad thing? Work certainly has value, but does that mean it would be bad if we worked less? What about in a post-scarcity world of abundance? What about the idea that work gives people a sense of meaning and purpose? Would we be lost without it…
 
The threat of the widespread automation of the economy puts two strands of American ideology into direct conflict: the value of technological innovation and the insistence that one's living must be earned. Out of this conflict, people from all parts of the political spectrum are increasingly supportive of a universal basic income. But are the robot…
 
It’s time to break down Kamala Harris’ middle class tax cut and the rest of her 2020 platform! Will the policy help middle and working class families? How much? Does it help the most vulnerable? And if the tax cuts are her number one priority, what does this mean for the other ambitious progressive proposals she supports? Toby Napoletano, Michael H…
 
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