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Delivered before breakfast, The Economist Morning Briefing tells you what’s on the global agenda in the coming day, what to look out for in business, finance and politics and, most importantly, what to make of it. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions, including the full Economist Morning Briefing: https://www.economist.com/briefingoffer Digital subscribers to The Economist should log in at https://briefing.economist.com for access to the full ...
 
Think Like an Economist and you’ll see the world more clearly, empowering you to make better decisions at work, at home, and in your community. Leading economists Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers will take you on a joyous romp through their field as they introduce you to the big ideas in economics, and show how you can apply them to live in your own life. Their signature approach reveals that every decision is an economic decision and this podcast uncovers the economic forces that shape t ...
 
Este é o Economisto, o novo podcast de economia e políticas públicas do IDP. Economia e outras áreas do conhecimento se misturam em debates sobre o tempo em que vivemos. O professor Pedro Fernando Nery conversa com economistas, juristas, e profissionais de diversos campos. Na primeira temporada, o tema é desigualdade. Acadêmicos, juristas e formadores de opinião conversam sobre como construir um País mais justo. Estamos disponíveis nos principais agregadores de Podcast, e também no site de P ...
 
Since the late 19th century, politics and economics have been split from each other, pretended and positioned as separate and unassuming forces. This could not be further from the truth. Before the dawn of Adam Smith, the grandfather of modern day economics, there was but one holistic concept, the Political Economy. Come join Max and Jorrel, modern day Political Economists, as they do their best to converse and discuss political theory, history, economics, and more in the lenses of contempor ...
 
The Economist unlocks the science, data and politics behind the most ambitious inoculation programme the world has ever seen. Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, hosts with Natasha Loder, our health-policy editor. Each week our reporters and data journalists join them in conversation, along with scientists around the world. They inject the perfect dose of insight and analysis into the global effort to escape the pandemic.
 
Economist and scholar Beth Akers seeks to inform aspiring students about how to make strategic decisions about their higher education. Speaking on topics like how to use data to shop for college or non-college alternatives, how to utilize the student loan system to your advantage, and more, Beth cuts through the romanticism we often attach to college decision making and teaches listeners how to make decisions that are grounded in data and fact.
 
For over 175 years, The Economist has provided fair, rigorous, and mind-stretching analysis for a globally curious audience. This podcast, from The Economist Intelligence Unit, builds on that legacy by providing perspectives for industry and management to understand how the world is changing, and how that creates opportunities to be seized, and risks to be managed. Each episode will draw on the expertise of our editors, and other thought leaders to examine insights from our global programmes ...
 
Do you consider economics to be boring and overly complex? This podcast will change your mind. Tune in to grasp complex economic theory, problems and events in a digestible way so you can keep informed and empower yourself with the tools to engage in intellectual debate. If you're looking to boost your general knowledge of world-wide economic events and understand how changes in markets and government policies affect your well-being, this is the place to start. Follow and contact me on Insta ...
 
The Digital Economist Speaker Series drives radical collaboration between global action leaders on the most urgent topics and challenges we face today: climate, health, society, economics. With the global population facing multiple man-made crises that threaten our existence and the wellbeing of the planet, using science and technology to serve human needs is no longer a choice – it's a necessity.
 
Special Relationship is a podcast collaboration that examines the US presidential election from the characteristic perspectives of two leading news organizations. Hosted by The Economist’s John Prideaux and Mic’s Celeste Katz, Special Relationship grapples with the major themes and issues in a campaign that has been anything but predictable. Each episode is a conversation, fusing deep dives into specific themes with broader perspectives provided by global and historical comparisons from both ...
 
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On his first overseas trip as president, Joe Biden has promised to send 500m covid-19 jabs to countries that need them. America’s vaccine success is making up for its failure to control the virus last year. Is the pandemic over in America? Kavita Patel, a primary care doctor, tells us new covid cases have all but vanished and Bruno Maçães, author o…
 
The founder of Bumble talks to Anne McElvoy about whether dating apps have killed romance. Is she cashing in on feminism by building a brand around female empowerment? The world’s youngest female self-made billionaire explains why she’s calling for more diversity in the tech industry. And, what’s her mantra for love? Please subscribe to The Economi…
 
The clean-energy business is thriving. Theories of decarbonisation are finally being put into practice. But how can the green boom avoid getting bogged down? Plus, the new geopolitics of business: American and Chinese big companies dominate. How did Europe become an also-ran and can it recover its footing? And, why the ghost storefronts of Fifth Av…
 
After a short break, The Grower and The Economist is back! This week, we welcome guest expert Lee Wonders, the National Sales Manager for Dosatron International. Lee shares his 20+ years of horticulture experience with out listeners. Before working at Dosatron he was a nursery grower, owner, and manager. Lee explains what water powered dosing techn…
 
After almost two decades, the FDA has granted conditional approval to a drug for the treatment of Alzheimer’ disease, called aducanumab. But the new drug, and its approval, is surrounded by controversy. Will the gamble pay off? Also, a clever upgrade to fog-collecting technology which could provide a water source in remote locations. And, potential…
 
On May 18, AEI hosted a panel discussion on how to make data-driven decisions about higher education. The University of North Carolina System’s Andrew P. Kelly, The Wall Street Journal’s Josh Mitchell, and Braven’s Vince Marigna discussed Beth Akers’ new book, “Making College Pay: An Economist Explains How to Make a Smart Bet on Higher Education” (…
 
On World Oceans Day, senior editor Naka Kondo speaks to Tom Peacock-Nazil, founder of Seven Clean Seas, and his colleague Oli Kade, sustainability specialist, about tackling the problems of plastic pollution in the ocean. Relevant links: Back to Blue, The Economist Group and The Nippon Foundation's multi-year initiative on pollution and ocean healt…
 
Vaccinations have helped ease national lockdowns, but restrictions on international travel remain severe. When and how might they be lifted? Willie Walsh of the International Air Transport Association tells us airlines are a soft target for government restrictions. Aerosol physicist Lidia Morawska assesses how risky it is to travel by plane. The Ec…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the new geopolitics of business, Brazil’s dismal decade (9:25), and how to be the next Tesla (16:30) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for pr…
 
The coronavirus pandemic took the world by surprise. But experts had been predicting something similar for decades. Which other threats deserve more attention—from solar flares and rogue AI to antibiotic resistance? And how has the pandemic affected efforts to prepare for them? Also, the mission to crash a space probe into an asteroid, and how it c…
 
The US Government has increased unemployment benefits, which means many workers are paid more to stay home than to work. The Christian worldview clearly states that we should not incentivize sloth. In the Wall Street Journal this week, Daniel Henninger asks “Is the American work ethic dying?” and the subtitle reads, “Covid laid off……
 
Tune in to my conversation with WA Business News Journalist, Matt McKenzie. Here we dive into key federal budget outcomes to secure economic recovery after the pandemic and importantly, what this means for Australia. Is there room for Modern Monetary Theory? When should we expect interest rates to increase? Should we be concerned about this fiscal …
 
Neste episódio falamos com a economista Priscilla Tavares. Ela contou sua trajetória como economista, falou sobre políticas públicas para educação, desperdício de oportunidades e o impacto da pandemia na educação dos brasileiros. A Priscilla também deixou um recado para as jovens economistas, para confiarem na sua percepção a respeito de que caminh…
 
For the seven world leaders meeting in Britain the immediate crises are clear. But a broader question hangs over them: how can the G7 maintain its relevance? A ruling in Britain excites a debate that takes in free speech, trans rights and workplace policy. And “van life” keeps spreading but, as ever, not everything is as it seems on Instagram. Addi…
 
The founder of Bumble talks to Anne McElvoy about whether dating apps have killed romance. Is she cashing in on feminism by building a brand around female empowerment? The world’s youngest female self-made billionaire explains why she’s calling for more diversity in the tech industry. And, what’s her mantra for love? Please subscribe to The Economi…
 
Air bases have been handed over; America’s remaining troops are shipping out and NATO forces are following suit. Can Afghanistan’s government forces hold off the Taliban? In parts of China, a playful wedding tradition goes a bit too far for Communist Party authorities’ taste. And a look at just how bad people are at coming up with accurate alibis. …
 
The clean-energy business is thriving. Theories of decarbonisation are finally being put into practice. But how can the green boom avoid getting bogged down? Plus, the new geopolitics of business: American and Chinese big companies dominate. How did Europe become an also-ran and can it recover its footing? And, why the ghost storefronts of Fifth Av…
 
As we enter our eleventh episode of the political economist podcast, Max and Jorrel turn to Rousseau to better understand how we need to uphold our own social contract to the state; while in turn, the state honoring their side of the deal as well. With the passing of Georgia’s (anti) Election Integrity Act, the duo question if this is for the gener…
 
As governments across South-East Asia crimp online freedoms, the region’s healthiest democracy might have been expected to resist the trend. Not so. President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua is using a new law to detain more of his potential adversaries in November’s election—and is coming under international pressure. And how Jordan’s gas-delivery-truc…
 
After almost two decades, the FDA has granted conditional approval to a drug for the treatment of Alzheimer’ disease, called aducanumab. But the new drug, and its approval, is surrounded by controversy. Will the gamble pay off? Also, a clever upgrade to fog-collecting technology which could provide a water source in remote locations. And, potential…
 
Piecemeal criminal-justice reforms following last year’s protests are coming up against hard numbers: violent crime is up. We ask what can, and should, be done. The man who led a coup in Mali last year has done it again; our correspondent considers how the tumult affects the wider, regional fight against jihadism. And the global spread of Japan’s b…
 
Vaccinations have helped ease national lockdowns, but restrictions on international travel remain severe. When and how might they be lifted? Willie Walsh of the International Air Transport Association tells us airlines are a soft target for government restrictions. Aerosol physicist Lidia Morawska assesses how risky it is to travel by plane. The Ec…
 
The run-up to the country’s largest-ever election has been bloody; the aftermath will set the tone for President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, whose record so far is woeful. Our analysis of listed green-technology firms reveals striking growth—but as with any tech-stock spike, it is worth asking whether it is all a bubble. And a look at two missions…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the new geopolitics of business, Brazil’s dismal decade (9:25), and how to be the next Tesla (16:30) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for pr…
 
The belief that people should advance according to their abilities rather than family pedigree is one of history’s most revolutionary ideas. But the meritocratic ideal that has inspired Americans since Thomas Jefferson has lost its lustre. Social mobility has stalled and critics on both right and left see a country captured by self-serving elites. …
 
The Saudi-backed government is hobbled; separatism is spreading; a humanitarian crisis grows by the day. A rebel advance on a once-safe city will only prolong a grinding war. We look at the scourge of doping in horse racing ahead of this weekend’s Belmont Stakes. And the last surviving foreign fighter in Spain’s civil war was a revolutionary to the…
 
How to remember the past in the digital present? The author of “In Memory of Memory” talks to Anne McElvoy about charting her family’s history, her nomination for the International Booker Prize, and what young Russians want from politics. And, what are the challenges of parenting in the age of visual technology? Please subscribe to The Economist fo…
 
How to remember the past in the digital present? The author of “In Memory of Memory” talks to Anne McElvoy about charting her family’s history, her nomination for the International Booker Prize, and what young Russians want from politics. And, what are the challenges of parenting in the age of visual technology? Please subscribe to The Economist fo…
 
The bloc seems at last to have a firm hand on inoculation and recovery—but efforts to engineer even progress among member states are not quite panning out. In recent years Bangladesh’s government has been cosy with a puritanical Islamist group; we ask why the relationship has grown complicated. And a genetic-engineering solution to the problem of m…
 
President Joe Biden wants to Europeanise the American welfare state. How will the biggest social-policy experiment since the 1960s work—and who will pay for it? Also, the work from home revolution promises a financial reckoning for commercial property. And, as LGBT+ Pride month begins, how can companies avoid “rainbow-washing”? Host Simon Long expl…
 
President Joe Biden wants to Europeanise the American welfare state. How will the biggest social-policy experiment since the 1960s work—and who will pay for it? Also, the work from home revolution promises a financial reckoning for commercial property. And, as LGBT+ Pride month begins, how can companies avoid “rainbow-washing”? Host Simon Long expl…
 
In this episode of the Political Economists, Max and Jorrel have a long form interview and discussion with their editor and script writer, Michael. The main topic being around the Wollstonecraft op-ed, Michael dives into what he's learned since he's started working on the Political Economists podcast and where he hopes the podcast will go in the fu…
 
A walkout in the Texas legislature is just the most dramatic of broad efforts to restrict voting rights—in particular of minority voters. We examine the risks to America’s democracy. Changes in climate and populations are driving nomadic Nigerian herders into increasing conflict; how to preserve their way of life? And a new kind of space race aims …
 
Airborne transmission is one of the main ways that SARS-CoV-2 spreads. So why has it taken so long to be officially recognised? Host Kenneth Cukier and science correspondent Alok Jha investigate the flaws in public-health guidelines and how to assess the risk of aerosol contagion. It is time for a revolution in ventilation. For full access to The E…
 
Airborne transmission is one of the main ways that SARS-CoV-2 spreads. So why has it taken so long to be officially recognised? Host Kenneth Cukier and science correspondent Alok Jha investigate the flaws in public-health guidelines and how to assess the risk of aerosol contagion. It is time for a revolution in ventilation. For full access to The E…
 
Beth speaks with Bryan Caplan, Professor of Economics at George Mason University, about his book, “The Case Against Education: Why the Education System Is a Waste of Time and Money” (Princeton University Press, 2018). They both talk about the signaling model vs the human capital model of higher education, the current “arms-race” surrounding postsec…
 
The only thing that unites the parties of a would-be government is the will to oust Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu. What chance their coalition can secure political stability? A new report reveals where the gangsters of the Balkans are stashing their loot: in an increasingly distorted property market. And a look at the mysterious case of Canada’…
 
In this episode, senior editor Jason Wincuinas speaks to Global Forecasting Director of The Economist Intelligence Unit, Agathe Demarais, about recently published report on China and Russia’s vaccine diplomacy efforts across Asia. Read the vaccine diplomacy article or download report. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.…
 
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