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Physics World Weekly offers a unique insight into the latest news, breakthroughs and innovations from the global scientific community. Our award-winning journalists reveal what has captured their imaginations about the stories in the news this week, which might span anything from quantum physics and astronomy through to materials science, environmental research and policy, and biomedical science and technology. Find out more about the stories in this podcast by visiting the Physics World web ...
 
Physics is full of captivating stories, from ongoing endeavours to explain the cosmos to ingenious innovations that shape the world around us. In the Physics World Stories podcast, Andrew Glester talks to the people behind some of the most intriguing and inspiring scientific stories. Listen to the podcast to hear from a diverse mix of scientists, engineers, artists and other commentators. Find out more about the stories in this podcast by visiting the Physics World website. If you enjoy what ...
 
The award winning Brain Candy Podcast is Candy for Your Left Brain and Your Right Brain. Hosts Sarah Rice and Susie Meister from MTV's The Challenge discuss what gets their wheels turning in the worlds of pop culture, literature, science, and psychology. They will share their favorite insights on everything from reality TV to quantum physics. So enjoy some candy for your noggin with the Brain Candy Podcast.
 
What does it actually mean to be rational? The kind of rationality where you make good decisions, even when it's hard; where you reason well, even in the face of massive uncertainty; where you recognize and make full use of your fuzzy intuitions and emotions, rather than trying to discard them. In Rationality: From AI to Zombies, Eliezer Yudkowsky explains the science underlying human irrationality with a mix of fables, argumentative essays, and personal vignettes. These eye-opening accounts ...
 
Join philosopher, educator and celebrated speaker on the cognitive sciences Thom Knoles for conversations with leaders, teachers, authors and professors designed to inspire and provoke deeper insight. Thom is an renowned expert on the relationship between quantum physics and human consciousness, and on the 5,000 year-old body of wisdom known as the Veda. For over 40 years, he has personally taught meditation to tens of thousands of students and consulted to governments and private corporations.
 
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show series
 
The second week in December is Black in Nanotech Week and its co-founder Olivia Geneus is our guest in this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast. Geneus talks to Margaret Harris about her interest in using nanotechnology to develop new ways of treating cancer, and about the need to highlight the accomplishments of Black scientists in the fie…
 
An unlimited world of structures built from precision-engineered unit parts – it is easy to see why LEGO appeals to many physicists. But in addition to the pure enjoyment, this plastic construction toy is also a great teaching tool, and it has even featured in serious science experiments. In the November episode of Physics World Stories, Andrew Gle…
 
Today we find out why the Pope might be getting frisky on Instagram. Find out why scientists are trying to figure out what England smelled like hundreds of years ago. We celebrate the inductees to the Toy Hall of Fame, & lament the toys who did not make the cut. Hear why your desserts might have beaver butt secretions in them & some people drink co…
 
Today we get into the Christmas spirit, but Sarah brings a little bah humbug as well. We hear why an American tourist went to prison for leaving a negative TripAdvisor review. Susie shares the history of the baby book, and it's more adorable than we realized. Find out why garlic has been used to designated social class for centuries. Susie reveals …
 
“My mission is to demystify quantum computing,” says Ilyas Khan, who is founder and chief executive of Cambridge Quantum Computing (CQC) – a UK-based provider of software for quantum computers. Khan is our guest in this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, and he explains how CQC helps its clients use quantum computers to solve big problems…
 
Today we get the scoop about what really happened in Sarah's apartment recently. She discusses some amazing women like Emily Harrington who was the first woman to scale El Capitan in less than one day. We hear about a "fuckboi" with a heart of gold. Sarah teaches us how to break up with someone tactfully, & we debate whether text breakups are ok. W…
 
Dark-matter detectors usually conjure up images of large underground facilities, but relatively small quantum sensors such as atomic clocks and magnetometers have also joined the search for the elusive stuff. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, Andrei Derevianko at the University of Nevada, Reno explains how it is done. We are also…
 
Today we find out why Sarah didn't really enjoy SpOoOoOoOoKy season this year. We learn why she went on a new diet, and it's a mixed bag. Susie describes a new 3-D art exhibit to provide a full sensory Van Gogh experience, but some art critics aren't happy about it. We learn the science behind "haunted painting effect" and why it's helping Susie en…
 
Today we hear why one woman decided to train her husband as if he were a dolphin, and it somehow worked. We learn what Lori Loughlin's prison is like, and we aren't happy, but for different reasons. We learn the science behind the fear of clowns, and then we wonder which part of the clown is the creepiest and whether all people who wear a lot of ma…
 
This episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast features an interview with Carol Marsh, who was recently honoured by the UK’s Queen Elizabeth II for her work on diversity and inclusion. Edinburgh-based Marsh talks about her role as deputy head of electronics engineering at the aerospace and defence company Leonardo and about her efforts to get mor…
 
Today we hear how Susie was actually excited to talk to someone on an airplane, & why Sarah thinks it was a miracle. We hear how zoom is causing people to feel bad about themselves. We find out how one Black influencer got Instagram to change their double standards toward breasts. We learn what a dinosaur butthole looks like, & realize why humans a…
 
Today we find out why Sarah's apartment is reminding us of Celine Dion. Sarah is preemptively mourning the death of her dog. We hear about Sarah scratching someone's car, & her decision to do the right thing, but she wonders if she is being punished anyway by the universe. We learn how Sarah is a genius at putting together furniture. We discuss why…
 
If we are to create a colony on the Moon – perhaps as a jumping off point for the human exploration of Mars – we will need a source of water. In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast, planetary scientist Hannah Sargeant of the Open University explains how water could be obtained on the Moon and what it would be used for. This week we als…
 
Today we learn about a new documentary that made Susie concerned about "basement dwellers." We are delighted by a Nobel Prize winner who found out about his award through a security camera. We discuss a famous journalist who exposed himself on a zoom work call. Susie freaks out about a woman who was mistaken for dead & nearly buried alive. We learn…
 
Today we hear about why quarantine provided us with a Dickensian A Christmas Story experience. Sarah decided to get back in the ocean after years on land. We learn facts about bats including that some bats exercise on...treadmills. Sarah had a run-in with bad jokes at a restaurant. We find out about a man who created a charity race that made us thi…
 
This week is #BlackInPhysics week, a series of events dedicated to celebrating Black physicists and their contributions to the scientific community. In this episode of the podcast, we talk to two of the week’s co-organizers, Ashley Walker and Xandria Quichocho, about what #BlackInPhysics week involves, why it’s needed and what they hope to achieve.…
 
Today we debate whether all vaginas are beautiful or some of them are floppity sloppity. Susie talks about a new documentary about cryogenics, and we debate whether people should freeze themselves after death. We learn about a family who lived in isolation in Siberia for 40 yrs, missed WWII and the moon landing, & their reasons for hiding. We debat…
 
Finding a material that is a superconductor at room temperature has been the Holy Grail of condensed matter physics for over a century. In this episode we meet Ranga Dias of the University of Rochester whose team has created a material that is a superconductor at 15 °C. The only catch is that it has to be squeezed at a pressure of two million atmos…
 
Today we discuss an incident on a flight where a man had a very unfortunate side effect to sleeping medication. Sarah teaches us all the steps to get people to like you. We revisit our obsession with Great British Baking Show. Sarah thinks about joining the Sierra Club. We debate whether when someone is called "flirtatious" they're really being cal…
 
Today we hear the latest music series Susie is obsessed with. We find out who her newest Pen(itentiary) pal is. We learn why eating a pickle before your next date might help ease your anxiety. Susie reveals why the pandemic isn't all bad because we got a new cheese out of the deal. We discuss a period underwear that was banned from Facebook for a r…
 
This episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast features interviews with two leaders in the race to build practical quantum computers. Michelle Simmons is director of Australia’s Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology. She talks about how her early work on fabricating solar cells kindled a passion for building el…
 
Today we find out why Susie is having a "conservative" moment where she wants people to pull themselves up by their bootstraps. Sarah reveals why having just a few plants changes your brain. We find out why she had a run-in at the dog park and had to womansplain. We celebrate the return of The Price is Right, and hear what 90s shows should and shou…
 
Media coverage of quantum computing often focusses on the long term potential for these devices to leave classical computing in the dust. But what about the rudimentary quantum systems that are already being developed and tested by technology companies? What are the latest advances in the field? And what might these systems realistically be able to…
 
Today we debate the virtues of vision boards, & talk about the type of people who usually enjoy them. Sarah reveals that cats have a dominant hand, & we theorize why the devil that would be necessary. We discuss strategies for coping with change, and find out why you're probably wrong about what to expect out of life. We find out why lottery winner…
 
In this episode we look at the ground-breaking research on black holes that led to Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez winning the 2020 Nobel Prize for Physics. On hand are experts Laura Nuttall of the University of Portsmouth and the LIGO–Virgo–KAGRA collaboration, who studies gravitational waves from merging black holes and Harvard Uni…
 
Today we discuss how we often fall in love w/ the things we end up hating in our partners. We are effusive about our love of British Baking Show, and explain why it's even better than you think. Susie is pissed about "heat tourists" and then finds out Sarah is one. We find out why loneliness is extremely deadly, and learn about the importance of pl…
 
Today we find out why some researchers won't quit tickling their lab rats, and we have some ethical questions about it. Sarah follows up on her building's dying tree, and how she's made progress on her propagation. We discuss how some people have a rare ability to recognize faces quickly and accurately, and we are very jealous. Plus, Sarah reveals …
 
In this episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast Google’s Sergio Boixo explains why the tech giant is building its own quantum computers. Boixo will be a plenary speaker at the upcoming Quantum 2020 virtual conference, and we will be interviewing other plenary speakers in future episodes of the podcast. Next up is Ramon Barthelemy – a physicist …
 
Today we find out why Sarah is becoming a nail ASMR artist. We talk about a new tv show for kids where adults are completely naked. Susie describes a new Thai policy of shipping garbage to people. Sarah claims there was a rodent infestation in the Real World house. Hear the history of the CPR doll, the reason why some howler monkeys are overcompens…
 
Today we find out why Sarah's Jeopardy obsession is still growing. We discuss the documentary The Social Dilemma, & ways we can disconnect from the Internet. We celebrate the oldest python to lay eggs WITHOUT A MALE! We hear an article written by a robot & lament our eventual domination by machines. Susie is convinced the author who said he buried …
 
This week’s podcast focuses on Peer Review Week, an annual event honouring the vital role that peer review plays in maintaining the quality of published scientific papers. But while peer review is important, it’s certainly not perfect. The quality of reviews is not always up to scratch – as the darkly comic website Shit My Reviewers Say demonstrate…
 
Today we hear why Sarah's recent pie baking somehow made her feet hurt. We discuss the documentary My Octopus Teacher, & why Sarah was both moved & upset by the filmmaker. Sarah reveals a shocking fact about lobsters, & Susie is not ok with it. We debate the virtues of The Home Edit & organizational porn, & Susie's opinion is surprising given her p…
 
The news last week that scientists had spotted a potential signature of life in the clouds of Venus was always likely to cause a stir. But arriving the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic – during which our everyday lives have changed significantly – the story has truly captured the public imagination. In the latest episode of the Physics World Stories…
 
Sarah has a dilemma involving a tree, & Susie wants her to steal it. Hear about a documentary that gave Susie hope, & another one that made her miss Pennsylvania Polka. We debate whether a professor should be punished for accidentally using a slur. Find out why Betty Boop is the most famous example of cultural appropriation. We learn the origins of…
 
In this episode the astronomy writer Keith Cooper is on hand to chat about the surprising discovery of phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus. He explains that here on Earth, microbial life is the only natural source of phosphine – which could mean that life exists in the clouds of Venus. Cooper also speculates about how future missions to the “habit…
 
Today we hear about muscle mass in space and an experiment being done with mice that we imagine makes them float around the space station (but it probably doesn't). Sarah comes up with a movie idea with Air Bud. We learn whether male and female mice parent differently. Sarah explains why ketchup isn't really a liquid or a solid, & you're probably u…
 
Today we find out why some birds were high on opioids & how it affected their singing. We hear about a new documentary about an amusement park that Susie cannot quit talking about. We learn the science behind duck's feathers being water-resistant. We debate Bella Thorne's Only Fans scandal. Susie talks about a librarian who stole $8M worth of books…
 
For almost 75 years, the Doomsday Clock has monitored how close humankind is to global catastrophe. With the clock now closer to midnight than ever before, the science writer Rachel Brazil talks to Physics World’s Matin Durrani about how the clock is set by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists and how physicists can engage in public debates about …
 
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