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Brian Lehrer, of WNYC Radio's Brian Lehrer Show, also hosts an hour-long weekly television show on CUNY-TV. In addition to highlighting new academic research with the power to transform society and policy in a regular segment called, "Public Intellectual," Brian interviews experts on a wide variety of topics including: the digital age and how it’s transforming our world; new social and political trends and current events in New York City and beyond; entrepreneurs of change; grassroots enviro ...
 
FROM OPEN AIR TO ON THE AIR! Join WNYC and The Public Theater as we bring Free Shakespeare in the Park to the airwaves with William Shakespeare’s RICHARD II. Brought to you in a serialized radio broadcast over four nights, listen as the last of the divinely anointed monarchs descends and loses it all. When King Richard banishes his cousin Henry Bolingbroke and deprives him of his inheritance, he unwittingly creates an enemy who will ultimately force him from the throne. One of the Bard’s onl ...
 
W. Eugene Smith was a famous photo essayist for LIFE magazine and a suburban family man when he left it all in 1957 and moved to a rundown loft in Manhattan. The building had already become a popular hangout and jamming space for jazz players both prominent and obscure, and Smith spent the next decade documenting the music, conversations and personalities that passed through. This program, produced and hosted by Sara Fishko and originally heard as a 10-part radio series in 2009, pulls from t ...
 
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Richard is imprisoned and Bolingbroke is now King Henry. But the new king immediately faces new challenges: The Duke of York discovers that men still loyal to Richard intend to stage a coup. And a member of Henry’s court, a knight named Exton, believes Henry has tasked him with killing Richard. DIVE DEEPER INTO RICHARD II: Read the radio play scrip…
 
Bolingbroke’s power increases, and his men urge him to claim more than just his stolen inheritance. Bolingbroke confronts Richard at Flint Castle, and the king agrees to return to London. Back in court, Bolingbroke moves to depose the king. Will Richard give up the crown on his own? Or will Bolingbroke have to take seize it? DIVE DEEPER INTO RICHAR…
 
King Richard’s wealthy uncle, John of Gaunt, is on his deathbed, heartbroken over the banishment of his son, Bolingbroke. Gaunt hopes to warn Richard about the dire state of the kingdom, but the king does not heed his warning. When Gaunt dies, Richard claims Gaunt’s inheritance — intended for the banished Bolingbroke — and uses it to fund a war wit…
 
The Duke of Gloucester has been murdered. Now the young King Richard must settle a dispute between two members of his court, Thomas Mowbray and Henry Bolingbroke, over who is responsible for the killing. Richard calls for a trial by combat, and the men prepare to face one another in a fight to the death. But just as it is beginning, Richard abruptl…
 
FROM OPEN AIR TO ON THE AIR! Join WNYC and The Public Theater as we bring Free Shakespeare in the Park to the airwaves with William Shakespeare’s RICHARD II. Brought to you in a serialized radio broadcast over four nights, listen as the last of the divinely anointed monarchs descends and loses it all. When King Richard banishes his cousin Henry Bol…
 
In this episode, thanks to W. Eugene Smith's tape recorders, we get to experience something audiences rarely hear - the unrehearsed, imperfect, open-ended, overlong, rough-around-the-edges music that jazz players made when they got together to jam at 821 Sixth Avenue. No audience present. Just the musicians playing. The late vibes player Teddy Char…
 
Few people in history had as much access to the greatest jazz musicians of our time as W. Eugene Smith. The famous LIFE magazine photographer moved in 1957 to a rundown, bohemian loft on 6th avenue, in the heart of Manhattan’s Flower District. During this time, the likes of Thelonius Monk, Chick Corea and Hall Overton slept here, smoked here, and p…
 
Before photographer W. Eugene Smith lived in a rundown loft in the thick of New York’s jazz scene, he lived in another world. A native Kansan who earned a scholarship to Notre Dame, Smith was a staff photographer for LIFE magazine -- considered photojournalism's top job in an era when photographers were major stars. What compelled him to leave that…
 
W. Eugene Smith recorded more than 4,000 hours in his Manhattan loft. Some 139 different personalities—musicians, writers and artists—make appearances. The conversations are one thing, but the impromptu jam sessions, involving remarkable musical collaborations, add to the incredible story of what became known as the Jazz Loft.…
 
By day, Hall Overton was an instructor of classical music at Juilliard. By night, he was living, teaching, and playing jazz piano at the Jazz Loft. In this episode, some of the musicians who knew him best share their memories of the brilliant, self-effacing man with an ever-present cigarette dangling from his lip.…
 
Ron Free, a prodigious drummer from Charleston, South Carolina, was the Jazz Loft’s "house drummer" from 1958 to 1960. Holing up in W. Eugene Smith’s apartment for weeks at a time, he jammed with everyone from Thelonious Monk to Chick Corea. Eventually, Free's personal struggles with drug addiction forced him to leave New York. But Smith’s tapes pr…
 
In the early mornings, as each all-night jam session at the loft came to a close, musicians stumbled out into the fragrant air of the surrounding flower shops. For W. Eugene Smith, the Flower District was more than a neighborhood -- it was an obsession, and a subject crucial to his evolution as a photographer and an artist. This episode explores th…
 
In early 1959, a genuine stir was created in the loft -- even among the more seasoned jazz players -- when Thelonious Monk turned up to arrange his music and rehearse with the help of drummer Hall Overton. Monk and Overton had a rare chemistry, and the result of their labors made a little history on February 29th, when they took the stage at New Yo…
 
The commercial jazz world relied on by-the-hour club dates and recording sessions, but the after-hours loft scene gave musicians the luxury of forgetting time, as they played through long, uninterrupted, all-night jam sessions. In this episode, hear immersive samples of the young Chick Corea and other musicians from W. Eugene Smith's recordings.…
 
It was hard not to notice that by the early 60s, things had changed dramatically for the Jazz Loft set. Folk and rock music had gained in popularity. Life in New York was becoming more expensive. The late-night jam sessions slowed down, and Smith became more isolated as the loft scene faded away. Finally around 1965, his tapes stopped rolling for g…
 
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