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Gardens are more than collections of plants. Gardens and Gardeners are intersectional spaces and agents for positive change in our world. Cultivating Place: Conversations on Natural History and the Human Impulse to Garden is a weekly public radio program & podcast exploring what we mean when we garden. Through thoughtful conversations with growers, gardeners, naturalists, scientists, artists and thinkers, Cultivating Place illustrates the many ways in which gardens are integral to our natura ...
 
This podcast series presents recordings of talks given at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History as part of its public programme of events. The Museum of Natural History was founded in 1860, and today it holds an internationally significant collection of natural history specimens and archives. Housed in a stunning neo-Gothic building inspired by the Pre-Raphaelites, the Museum is home to a lively programme of research, teaching and public events.
 
The Natural History of Chocolate being a Distinct and Particular Account of the Cocoa-tree, its Growth and Culture, and the Preparation, Excellent Properties, and Medicinal Virtues of its Fruit. Wherein the Errors of those who have wrote upon this Subject are discovered; the Best Way of Making Chocolate is explained; and several Uncommon Medicines drawn from it, are communicated. - Summary by D. de Quelus
 
With the 2006 acquisition of the Burndy Library (a collection of nearly 70,000 items), The Huntington became one the top institutions in the world for the study of the history of science and technology. In November 2008, The Huntington opened Dibner Hall of the History of Science, which features the permanent exhibition “Beautiful Science: Ideas that Change the World.” It includes galleries devoted to astronomy, natural history, medicine, and light. In lectures and interviews, curators and s ...
 
Children are full of curiosity and questions about the world. Each Friday, join Molly Oldfield, the very first question writer (or QI Elf) on the BBC TV show QI and author of four books as she answers questions - with the help of experts from Neil Gaiman, Heston Blumenthal, Grayson Perry, Lauren Child, Richard Branson and Sophie Dahl to the fish curators at the Natural History Museum - sent into the show by children around the world. If you're a kid - big or small - with questions you want a ...
 
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Rusty Hinges

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Rusty Hinges

Basement Fort Productions LLC

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The world can be a mysterious place. It can also be a boring place, so let’s focus on the mysterious. Rusty Hinges is a podcast that explores mysteries, hoaxes, natural phenomena, and weird history. Basically, anything that’s a bit… hinky.
 
The Natural Reward podcast will focus on questions of innovation, progress and advancement in the evolution of life. We will discuss the evolution of scientific theories, how to think critically about science, and questions of progress and advancement in technology and human culture. The Natural Reward podcast will cover the philosophy and history of science, evolutionary theory, and economic theory. Music by Christian Bjoerklund.
 
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Chesapeake Almanac

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Chesapeake Almanac

Chesapeake Bay Foundation

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Join retired Chesapeake Bay Foundation Senior Naturalist John Page Williams every Wednesday for inside accounts of our Bay’s creatures and seasonal events. Follow the Bay through the seasons. Williams' fascinating natural history will enable those who love the Chesapeake to tune in to life around the Bay. The fishing enthusiast will discover things that help him or her catch more bluefish or white perch; the bird watcher and the hiker will learn when to look for the appearance of the ospreys ...
 
Welcome to Making a Splash: the arts and culture podcast that celebrates swimming and the sea. Host Amber Butchart is a keen but incredibly unaccomplished sea swimmer, who wants to investigate how swimming and the ocean inspire art, literature, design and culture. Covering areas including myth & folklore, health & wellness, pop culture, literature, art & design, environment & sustainability and natural history, this is the podcast for everyone who has an affinity with water. Guests range fro ...
 
Hudson traveled to Patagonia to study the birds, but shortly upon arrival accidentally shot himself in the knee, requiring a lengthy period of idleness to recover, hence the title of the book. It's not just a work of ornithology, but a personal memoir of the people and natural history of Patagonia. - Summary by Kevin Davidson
 
Sourcing accurate scientific information can be difficult in this age of polarized content. The goal of the podcast is to give you the opportunity to hear directly from the experts, through long-form conservation about natural history and conservation. This podcast is produced by the Oregon Chapter of The Wildlife Society in partnership with the Oregon Wildlife Foundation. Hosted by John Goodell. John is a wildlife biologist, curator, and conservation educator. He is the President of the Ore ...
 
As one of the most watched documentary film series on public television, NATURE delivers the best in original natural history films to audiences nationwide. The Inside NATURE podcast picks up where the film series leaves off. We speak to filmmakers behind some of NATURE’s greatest films, track down updates on animal characters from past episodes, and go beyond the headlines to talk with experts on the frontline of wildlife research and conservation.
 
This is a travel tale of one family who was locked down for too long and desired freedom. Come join our family and explore with us as we begin our travels in Texas and the United States. This adventure will take us through Canada and back to the U.S. into Alaska and back again. Come with us while we explore the food, culture, sound, history, its natural wilderness and make small positive changes along the way.
 
Cain: A Mystery is Lord Byron's retelling of the classical Biblical story from the point of view of its antagonist. Undoubtedly influenced by Milton's Paradise Lost, Byron's Cain is defiant and questioning. In trying to come to terms with the mortality humanity has been punished with, he comes face to face with Lucifer, who takes him to the "Abyss of Space," shows him a vision of Earth's violent natural history, and gives him a true understanding of death. Upon his return, a devastated Cain ...
 
WVMR hit the airwaves on July 9th, 1981 as a lone AM community station in the National Radio Quiet Zone. 40 years later, Allegheny Mountain Radio has grown into a network that spans Pocahontas (WV), Highland, and Bath (VA) counties – straddling the West Virginia-Virginia Border and continues to provide hyper-local news and music programming to the Allegheny Highlands. Unique By Nature is a limited podcast series which explores the establishment and development of Allegheny Mountain Radio. Wh ...
 
The tides of American history lead through the streets of New York City — from the huddled masses on Ellis Island to the sleazy theaters of 1970s Times Square. The elevated railroad to the Underground Railroad. Hamilton to Hammerstein! Greg and Tom explore more than 400 years of action-packed stories, featuring both classic and forgotten figures who have shaped the world.
 
Join us on our mission to explore natural and supernatural phenomenon we find to be Weird and Fascinating! Tune in to hear us discuss Wonders of the World, Aliens, psychedelic medicines, architectural marvels, revolutionary technologies, astrology, A.I., history, magick, global warming, shark finning, astral travel, hermetic mysticism, & free masonry. Welcome to our Tribe of Weirdos!
 
Immerse yourself in Canada’s history! Witness to Yesterday episodes take listeners on a journey to document a time in Canada’s past and explore the people behind it, its significance, and its relevance to today. If you like our work, please consider supporting it: https://bit.ly/support_WTY. To learn more about the Society and Canada’s history, subscribe to our newsletter at https://bit.ly/news_WTY.
 
Nine Days in July is a new podcast documentary series that explores each of the nine days of the Apollo 11 Mission, day by day, in nine 60-minute-long episodes. While telling the story of the mission to the moon as it occurs, we also spin back, and spin out, into stories about Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins, NASA, the Space Race, and the history of the world-at-large during those 9 Days in July.
 
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Horrible History

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Horrible History

Emily Barlean and Rachel Everett

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Every city has its own horrible history. Each week hosts Emily Barlean and Rachel Everett will venture to two new cities and do a deep dive into a piece of history that you won't read about in the travel brochures – all the horrible, tragic and traumatic things that have happened in the history of the world.
 
Welcome to Storytelling DNA... Waffle-Free Style! Storytelling is as much a part of our DNA as our hair, skin and bones. It's what makes us human. The trouble is, as entertainment has got more CGI, we've lost faith in ourselves as natural tellers of fireside tales. In this chat and interview show, we explore the history, psychology and power of storytelling, and how we can ignite the storytelling flames at work, at home, and wherever else a story wants to be told. Fill your mug with somethin ...
 
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As we enter the season of seed saving, of easing into dormancy, beginning to consider next season through the lens of the last season, of forward planning, this week Cultivating Place explores some big thinking for our shared future in conversation with Severine Von Tscharner Fleming, one of the women featured in The Earth in Her Hands, 75 Extraord…
 
In The Better Angels of Our Nature Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker argued that modern history has witnessed a dramatic decline in human violence of every kind, and that in the present we are experiencing the most peaceful time in human history. But what do top historians think about Pinker's reading of the past? Does his argument stand up to his…
 
Today’s episode features stories from San Jose, CA & Worcester, UK. Reasons to Listen this Week: A severed arm Haunted houses for sale The Jason Derulo of surgeons A horse in the drive-through Contact Us: Instagram: @horriblehistorypod Twitter: @thehorriblepod Email: horriblehistorypodcast@gmail.com Support Your Hosts: Learn all about your options …
 
On Dec. 1, 1948, beachgoers came across a dead man on Australia’s Somerton beach. Well-dressed, and with no signs of trauma, his identity and cause of death eluded local police. Soon, investigators dubbed him the “Somerton Man.” It looked as though he’d simply laid down for a rest and died peacefully in his sleep. But when police arrived and began …
 
One of the fifty most influential living philosophers, a “self-promoting charlatan” (Brian Leiter), and the orchestrator of an “online orgy of stupidity” (Ray Brassier). In Skirmishes: With Friends, Enemies, and Neutrals (Punctum Books, 2020), Graham Harman responds with flair and wit to some of his best-known critics and fellow travelers. Pulling …
 
The Wild Hunt is a band of ghost warriors, witches or demons that stalk through the dark nights of Europe. But where do these tales originate? The answer might be more varied than you expect. This is a bonus episode for October that will be part of the Aloreing Podcast's Hallowe'en playlist. This playlist that will be updated through October and wi…
 
Kant, Applied is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Onora O’Neill, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge and a crossbench member of the House of Lords. After intriguing insights into Onora O’Neill’s path to becoming a Kant scholar, this wide-ranging conversation explores how Kant’s philosoph…
 
The 1830s to the 1930s saw the rise of large-scale industrial mining in the British imperial world. Elizabeth Carolyn Miller examines how literature of this era reckoned with a new vision of civilization where humans are dependent on finite, nonrenewable stores of earthly resources, and traces how the threatening horizon of resource exhaustion work…
 
In this week's show we answer three questions from Louise, Amy and Wilf. The team at Ladybird books explain how Everything Under The Sun - a curious question for every day of the year (the beautiful book of this podcast) was made. Find out how ladybirds get their spots and whether or not its on their birthday? We find out what fingernails on a blac…
 
Patrice Dutil discusses the life and military career of James Wolfe, the commander of British troops that conquered Quebec in 1759, with Larry Ostola. Ostola is the editor of the 2021 Volume of the Champlain Society entitled Your Most Obedient and Affectionate Son: James Wolfe’s Letters to His Parents, 1740-1759. Dutil and Ostola explore the qualit…
 
Democratic Lessons: What the Greeks Can Teach Us is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Josiah Ober, Tsakopoulos-Kounalakis Professor in Honor of Constantine Mitsotakis Professor of Political Science and Classics at Stanford University. This extensive conversation includes topics such as the serendipitous factors that…
 
Spooky Season, Round 2! This week, Emily kicks us off with a story of murder and mystery, witchcraft and German spies - the story of Bella and the Wych Tree. Then, Rachel talks about the Winchester Mystery House - a bizarre architectural wonder built by Sarah Winchester the widow of firearms magnate William Wirt Winchester. For 40 years she added o…
 
For the next two days, Jack Schmitt would do a running account of Earth’s weather patterns. One Capcom even called Schmitt the human weather satellite. The post Space Rocket History #374 – Apollo 17 – To the Moon first appeared on Space Rocket History Podcast.Di Michael Annis
 
As fall sets in, it's harvesttime around the Chesapeake. Finfish have fattened up on summer's bounty and the marshes provide a bumper crop of nutritious seed. Those who will enjoy this harvest are a remarkably varied lot. In this episode, John Page paints an autumn picture of the cornucopia of the Bay and the varied and ever-moving species partakin…
 
In the 1960s, the radical youth of Western Europe’s New Left rebelled against the democratic welfare state and their parents’ antiquated politics of reform. It was not the first time an upstart leftist movement was built on the ruins of the old. New Lefts: The Making of a Radical Tradition (Princeton University Press, 2021) traces the history of ne…
 
Theosophy across Boundaries: Transcultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives on a Modern Esoteric Movement (SUNY Press, 2020) brings a global history approach to the study of esotericism, highlighting the important role of Theosophy in the general histories of religion, science, philosophy, art, and politics. The first half of the book consists of…
 
Mary Wollstonecraft (1759 –1797) was one of the most important moral philosophers and political theorists ever. Her writings on liberty and equality have been embraced by thinkers both in her own day and since her early death. Lionized by feminists and demonized by others as dangerous and a loose woman to boot, Wollstonecraft produced a small but p…
 
If the United States has been so hostile to Marxism, what accounts for Marxism's recurrent attractiveness to certain Americans? Marxism and America: New Appraisals (Manchester University Press, 2021) sheds new light on that question in essays engaging sexuality, gender, race, nationalism, class, memory, and much more, from the Civil War era through…
 
Today’s episode features stories from Germany & Beijing, China. Reasons to Listen this Week: An 8-year-old alibi Stupid criminals: court edition Stolen fish sticks Square-dancing grannies Spontaneous cow combustion Senior citizen scammers Contact Us: Instagram: @horriblehistorypod Twitter: @thehorriblepod Email: horriblehistorypodcast@gmail.com Sup…
 
The fashionable and decorous men whom we recognize in portraits and letters from the Italian Renaissance penned some of the most scathing critiques of the courts in which they served. Such anti-courtly discourse furnished a platform for discussing pressing questions of early modern Italian society. The court was the space that witnessed a new form …
 
The phrase, “state of nature”, has been used over centuries to describe the uncultivated state of lands and animals, nudity, innocence, heaven and hell, interstate relations, and the locus of pre- and supra-political rights, such as the right to resistance, to property, to create and leave polities, and the freedom of religion, speech, and opinion,…
 
In this episode we set the stage for the story of Joan of Arc, one of the most enigmatic and fascinating people in history. To understand Joan we have to understand the Hundred Years' War, the festering quagmire into which she was born, and which she helped put an end to. Herein are dragons and whirlwinds, blood-soaked Vikings, slaughtered monks, b…
 
Race, while drawn from the visual cues of human diversity, is an idea with a measurable past, an identifiable present, and an uncertain future. The concept of race has been at the center of both triumphs and tragedies in American history and has had a profound effect on the human experience. Race Unmasked: Biology and Race in the Twentieth Century …
 
The following podcast may look like the history of New York City cemeteries -- from the early churchyards of the Colonial era to the monument-filled rural cemeteries of Brooklyn and Queens. But it's much more than that! This is a story about New York City itself, a tale of real estate, urban growth, class and racial disparity, superstition and arch…
 
On this award winning show, that goes along with the Everything Under The Sun BOOK we answer three questions a week, one with the help of an expert, two are answered by Molly Oldfield, the original QI elf and author of four books! Our first question is why do bad things exist answered by author Laura Dockrill. Next up find out what would happen if …
 
In our second episode focusing on the inspiring beauty of dry gardens and the plants and people who love them, Cultivating Place is joined this week by photo journalist Saxon Holt. The sole photographer on more than 30 garden books, Saxon is also owner of the PhotoBotanic Garden library and director of the Summer-Dry Project.Saxon’s most recent boo…
 
In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Daniel J. Robinson,. He is the author of Cigarette Natio: Business, Health, and Canadian Smokers, 1930–1975 published by McGill-Queen’s University Press in 2021. Robinson’s account illustrates how smoking became a habit for over half of Canadians, both men and women, by the early postwar period. T…
 
As this book intriguingly explores, for those who would make Rome great again and their victims, ideas of Roman decline and renewal have had a long and violent history. The decline of Rome has been a constant source of discussion for more than 2200 years. Everyone from American journalists in the twenty-first century AD to Roman politicians at the …
 
The Rādhā Tantra is an anonymous 17th-century tantric text from Bengal. Mans Broo's The Rādhā Tantra: A Critical Edition and Annotated Translation (Routledge, 2019) offers a lively picture of the meeting of different religious traditions in 17th century Bengal, since it presents a Śākta version of the famous Vaiṣṇava story of Rādhā and Kṛṣṇa. This …
 
Turning the Mirror: A View From the East is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and award-winning writer Pankaj Mishra. The conversation provides behind-the-scenes insights into several of Pankaj’s books, including From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia and An End To Suffering: The Buddha In The World…
 
Marxism is having a moment; higher workloads, stagnating wages, rising costs of living, a new economic crisis every few years, a warming climate and now almost two years of a worldwide pandemic have all led to a number of people across the world, especially younger people, to self-identify with ideas once thought to be in the dustbin of history. Bu…
 
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