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The United States of Anxiety: The United States of Anxiety is a show about the unfinished business of our history and its grip on our future. Many of the political and social arguments we’re having now started in the aftermath of the Civil War, when Americans set out to do something no one had tried before: build the world’s first multiracial democracy. The podcast gives voters the context to understand what’s at stake in this election. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other ...
 
Did you ever wish you could go back to class and learn about the most interesting, important, and impactful events in US history all over again...this time without the homework? If so, join the club! In this podcast, join Chris Caldwell and his fellow history nerds as they re-examine United States history one lesson at a time. Enjoy the podcast, and hopefully now you can take pride in knowing just a little bit more about the history of the United States.
 
Vol. I: The Colonial Period. Charles Austin Beard was the most influential American historian of the early 20th century. He published hundreds of monographs, textbooks and interpretive studies in both history and political science. He graduated from DePauw University in 1898, where he met and eventually married Mary Ritter Beard, one of the founders of the first Greek-letter society for women, Kappa Alpha Theta. Many of his books were written in collaboration with his wife, whose own interes ...
 
What happens when college public radio becomes unhinged? Join Professor Gordon Pringle of La Brea Community College ("Where The Tar Meets The Sidewalk"), for These United States Stories, as he interviews a man who lives in a whale, a consumer advocate for watchers of online porn, the proprietor of a family billy club business and other craftsmen, crackpots and characters from around the country. A new interview each week, painting a picture of the USA, one disturbing story at a time.
 
For American journalist and humorist Edgar Wilson Nye who wrote under the pen name Bill Nye in the late 19th century, facts are not to be presented in their newborn, bare state. They should be properly draped and embellished before they can be presented before the public. Hence, in the Comic History of the United States published in 1894, he gives his readers the facts. But in a bid to make the historical figures more human he describes them as “people who ate and possibly drank, people who ...
 
Immigration Consultant Mitchell Saum discusses Employment-Based visas, green cards, and general immigration to the United States.**Disclaimer: This content does not constitute legal advice and does not establish an attorney-client relationship. I am not an immigration attorney and if you are seeking legal advice, please contact a licensed immigration attorney.
 
The Amendments to the Constitution of the USA are a continuously modified document that attempts to secure all basic and other rights for American citizens. The most recent amendment was made in the early 1970's during the Vietnam war; this amendment lowered the voting age to 18. The first ten amendments (A.K.A. the Bill of Rights) was made by the founding fathers shortly after the actual constitution was made. The Bill of Rights covers all those things that the settlers found wrong with the ...
 
This pamphlet was published in the early 20th century by the United States Rubber Company so that "coming generations of our country ... have some understanding of the importance of rubber in our every day life... We believe the rubber industry will be better off if the future citizens of our country know more about it." Learn about Christopher Columbus's discovery of rubber, how the crafty British entrepreneur, Wickham, managed to smuggle rubber seedlings out of Brazil, and how rubber manuf ...
 
"Office of the Light-House Board, Washington, D.C. July 1, 1881. The following Instructions are published for the guidance of light-keepers. They are required to read them carefully and attentively, and to refer to them whenever they are any doubt in regard to their duties or the manner of performing them. Each keeper and assistant keeper will be furnished with a copy, to be kept and used at the light-stations where they are employed; to be handed over to their successors when they are relie ...
 
The National Sewer Agency is spying on people's toilets, looking for food terrorists... Food Enforcement Agent Jason Frolick believes in America. He believes in eating air. He struggles to get the food monkey off his back. As part of the Global War on Fat, his job is to put food terrorists in Fat Camp. When a pizza dealer gets whacked in the park across the street from the Thin House, the Prophet Jones himself asks Frolick to investigate. For the first time ever, Frolick solves a murder--but ...
 
The Inquiry into the Role and Oversight of Private Security Contractors in Afghanistan, which reported in September 2010, was precipitated by events in August 2008, when US forces bombed the Afghan village of Azizabad. This gave rise to a public dispute between the US Government and the United Nations about the level of fatalities caused by the attack and about whether those killed had been civilians or Taliban-linked insurgents. Allegations soon emerged that the attack had been based on fal ...
 
Charles Austin Beard was the most influential American historian of the early 20th century. He published hundreds of monographs, textbooks and interpretive studies in both history and political science. He graduated from DePauw University in 1898, where he met and eventually married Mary Ritter Beard, one of the founders of the first greek-letter society for women, Kappa Alpha Theta. Many of his books were written in collaboration with his wife, whose own interests lay in feminism and the la ...
 
More commonly know as "The Blue Book" written by "Baron von Steuben" this publication was key to organizing the young American military in the Revolutionary War with England. This book served both as a regulation and a how-to manual. Each officer was required to: purchase a copy upon being commissioned, carry it at all times, read it, and use it. (Summary by David Olson)
 
Charles Beard was the most influential American historian of the early 20th century. He published hundreds of monographs, textbooks and interpretive studies in both history and political science. He graduated from DePauw University in 1898, where he met and eventually married Mary Ritter Beard, one of the founders of the first greek-letter society for women, Kappa Alpha Theta. Many of his books were written in collaboration with his wife, whose own interests lay in feminism and the labor uni ...
 
In 1880, the New York Times reported a curious story from St. Albans, Vermont, about a mysterious figure, an attorney and Democratic operative named A. P. Hinman. Hinman privately told local Democratic leaders that he had been hired by the Democratic National Committee to obtain evidence that Vice-President-elect Chester A. Arthur was not qualified to hold the office of Vice President, but rather that Arthur was a Canadian-born alien. President Garfield was assassinated in 1881 and Arthur be ...
 
Through the U.S. Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) this series of communications has been de-classified and made public. Most names have been omitted, however much information of the sightings of UFOs in 1947 can be gleaned from these communications which were primarily between the FBI and other U.S. Government and military organizations.It should be noted that the U.S. Air Force only became a separate entity in 1947, having split from the U.S. Army at that time. And they became very busy ti ...
 
This is the official report, published nearly 11 months after the first and only atomic bombings in history (to date), of a group of military physicians and engineers who accompanied the initial contingent of U.S. soldiers into the destroyed cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The report presents a clinical description of the devastation, loss of life and continued suffering of the survivors that resulted from the world's first and only atomic bombings, to date. The appendix is an eyewitness a ...
 
A biographical encomium delivered on the occasion of Roosevelt's death. Theodore "T.R." Roosevelt, Jr. (1858 – 1919) was an American author, naturalist, explorer, historian, and politician who served as the 26th President of the United States. He was a leader of the Republican Party (the "GOP") and founder of the Progressive Party. He is noted for his exuberant personality, range of interests and achievements, and his leadership of the Progressive Movement, as well as his "cowboy" persona an ...
 
First published in 1908, A Short History of The United States by Edward Channing aims to provide a compact and concise account of the events that went into the making of the United States of America. Divided into 45 short chapters which are laid out point-wise, the book is designed as a school text book. Each chapter has a section at the end with a set of questions regarding the facts given in it. Beginning with theories about the first European who may have “discovered” the North American c ...
 
The Articles of Confederation: On November 15th, 1777 The Articles of Confederation became the first constitution of the United States, though not yet ratified by the thirteen original colonies. Ratification of the Articles took place almost three and a half years later on March 1st, 1781. The purpose of the articles was to create a confederation of sovereign states with a weak central government; thus allowing state governments to wield most of the power. It wasn’t long before the need for ...
 
American history is more than a collection of interesting stories, so why is it most often presented as such? It matters why things happened in the order they did. Join social historian Dr. Heath Mitton as he unpacks the story of the American Republic with special attention to how social and economic factors drove the politics of ideas, from the American Revolution through the presidency of Barack Obama. These episodes originally aired as a regular segment on 610 KVNU's For The People radio ...
 
Charles Beard was the most influential American historian of the early 20th century. He published hundreds of monographs, textbooks and interpretive studies in both history and political science. He graduated from DePauw University in 1898, where he met and eventually married Mary Ritter Beard, one of the founders of the first greek-letter society for women, Kappa Alpha Theta. Many of his books were written in collaboration with his wife, whose own interests lay in feminism and the labor uni ...
 
Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, our leading business news radio program and podcast is about providing context on the economic news of the day. Through stories, conversations and newsworthy developments, we help listeners understand the economic world around them. Marketplace makes sense of the economy for everyone, no econ degree or finance background required. Marketplace doesn’t just report on the numbers, we take it deeper, adding context to what’s happening in the stock market and how macroecono ...
 
Charles Beard was the most influential American historian of the early 20th century. He published hundreds of monographs, textbooks and interpretive studies in both history and political science. He graduated from DePauw University in 1898, where he met and eventually married Mary Ritter Beard, one of the founders of the first greek-letter society for women, Kappa Alpha Theta. Many of his books were written in collaboration with his wife, whose own interests lay in feminism and the labor uni ...
 
Henry Wirz (November 25, 1823 – November 10, 1865) was the only Confederate soldier tried after the end of the American Civi War. He was tried, convicted, and executed, not for being a Confederate soldier, but for conspiracy and murder relating to his command of Camp Sumter, the infamous Confederate prisoner-of-war prison at Andersonville, Georgia. Wirz encouraged and commanded barbaric and murderous policies and actions in the prison. This Librivox recording is excerpts from the 850 page su ...
 
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show series
 
As the country confronts racial tensions and class conflicts, the question begs: how did we get here? We look back to a moment in our history when our country was struggling to become a true, multiracial democracy -- and meeting a lot of roadblocks - many of which persist today. Historian Eric Foner gives us a primer on the Reconstruction Era amend…
 
Year(s) Discussed: 1803-1804 While diplomatic disagreements occupied the attention of the Jefferson administration, Vice President Aaron Burr was occupied with a dispute of a more personal matter in the aftermath of his failed gubernatorial bid. Alexander Hamilton’s opposition to his campaign did not go unnoticed, and Burr was determined to have Ha…
 
On September 18, 2020, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman to serve on the Supreme Court of the United States, passed away at the age of eighty-seven, vacating a seat on the High Court that she had held for twenty-seven years. It is likely that Justice Ginsburg’s views in closely decided Supreme Court cases will be of most interest to Mem…
 
Continuation of Part 1. Heather and Tom Frizzell further discuss the July 31, 2020 First Circuit Court decision to overturn Dzhokhar "Jahar" Tsarnaev's death sentence. In this episode, we talk about the remainder of the appellate rulings and the significance of the "smaller" issues, including the far-reaching consequences of anti-Muslim bias, new c…
 
Episode 135: The Texans strike a deal with Santa Anna while Van Buren is dealing with whether or not to annex this new independent republic. --------- Please be sure to subscribe and tell your friends! Leave us a review on iTunes and reach out to us on social media! Twitter: @ateachershist Facebook: A Teacher's History of the United States Podcast:…
 
Hog caller and stump speaker Alben Barkley defied all expectations. The son of a tobacco farmer with little money to spare became Vice President and sometimes, a contender for President. Senator and Majority Leader he prospered from his ability to speak. It even almost got him in trouble with the President he served, Harry Truman. The Original "Vee…
 
During last night’s presidential debate, you might (might!) have heard moderator Chris Wallace mention the distinction between a “V-shaped” and “K-shaped” economic recovery. On today’s show, we’ll look at what both letters symbolize. Plus: Massive layoffs at Disney parks, learning pods and taking back the streets in Los Angeles.…
 
Millions of students are in college, but not at college, this fall. They’re living and taking classes 100% remotely, but plenty more are on campus for all in-person classes or a hybrid model. Today we’ll check in on how they’re doing, and look at schools that are suspending admissions to doctoral programs for the next academic year. Plus: consumer …
 
That’s how one expert described what’s happening to airlines right now. Armageddon. On today’s show, we’ll look ahead to Thursday, when carrier’s bailout terms allow them to cut tens of thousands of jobs. But first, a conversation about race and the economy with Atlanta Fed President Raphael Bostic. Plus: grocery store algorithms, chip wars and mur…
 
At the United Nations General Assembly this week, China, which is the world’s largest polluter, pledged to become carbon neutral by 2060. Today, we’ll look at how that might work. Plus: California’s gas ban, piped-in crowd noise in sports and the history of voter suppression in the United States.Di Marketplace / Kai Ryssdal
 
You might feel adrift in the pandemic and its resulting recession, but not more than the 300,000 commercial ship workers who are stranded at sea right now. On today’s show, we’ll look at their situation. Plus: free speech online, socially distanced Fashion Week and Hollywood’s comeback.Di Marketplace / Kai Ryssdal
 
Florida voters said formerly incarcerated people should be able to vote. But the state’s courts said no — not unless those people pay off fines and fees. Now money is pouring into the state to pay off those fees and for the legal fight. We’ll talk about it. Plus: homeschooling, the FinCEN Files, airline bailouts and PPP fraud.…
 
On June 29, 2020, in the case Seila Law v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), the Supreme Court held in a five-to-four decision that the statutory provision limiting the President’s authority to remove the director of the CFPB violated the Constitution by infringing on the President’s powers to execute the laws. The opinion provides guida…
 
There’s a lot going on in the United States right now. The death toll from the COVID-19 pandemic has reached 200,000. The election’s in 42 days. There are fires in the West, storms in the South and in D.C., and a bitter fight over Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat on the Supreme Court. Amid all that, negotiations over additional aid for farmers almost pus…
 
The Republican Party has long sought a stable conservative majority in the Supreme Court. With the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat up for grabs, that could become a reality - but not without a fight. WNYC's Jami Floyd (Senior Editor for Race and Justice) and Elie Mystal (Justice Correspondent at The Nation) join us to set the scene for the …
 
In this special episode, we reflect on the life and legacy of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, following her passing on Friday. Kai is joined by Emily Bazelon (Staff Writer at The New York Times Magazine and Co-Host of “Political Gabfest” at Slate), WNYC’s own Brian Lehrer and callers like you to talk about the impact of the “Notorious RB…
 
… And both are banned under a new executive order from President Donald Trump. Today, we’ll talk about the ripple effects both on consumers, businesses, U.S.-China relations and the broader internet. Plus: futures contracts for water, remote learning and how museums are faring in the pandemic.Di Marketplace / Kai Ryssdal
 
Episode 134: Chris wraps up the fighting in the Texas Revolution with the Battles of Goliad and San Jacinto. --------- Please be sure to subscribe and tell your friends! Leave us a review on iTunes and reach out to us on social media! Twitter: @ateachershist Facebook: A Teacher's History of the United States Podcast: https://www.facebook.com/ateach…
 
No, not that kind of diet. We’re kicking off the show today talking about food: where we go out to eat it, where we buy it. First up, we’ll examine the hiring slowdown in restaurants, then we’ll look at the rise of online-only “dark” grocery stores. Later, we’ll look at N95 mask laws to protect agriculture workers and others who are in the smoke ri…
 
In the saga over the Chinese video app TikTok, Walmart and Microsoft are out and Oracle is in. They’re close to a deal, but Chinese media is reporting that Oracle won’t be getting TikTok’s algorithm. We’ll take you through what that would mean. Plus stories about volunteer firefighters, frequent fliers and Black women entrepreneurs in Detroit.…
 
Many teams have been playing without crowds this year but stadiums still have a captive audience. Sports editor and “Edge of Sports” podcast host Dave Zirin joins us for the hour as we explore how and when in our history athletes have taken a stand for civil rights and social justice. WNBA point guard Renee Montgomery talks about what led her to si…
 
Year(s) Discussed: 1803-1804 While Vice President Burr worked to secure his political future in his bid for the New York governorship and New England Federalists plotted to separate from the Union, the Jefferson family suffered the untimely loss of one of its members in the early months of 1804. Meanwhile, across the Atlantic, both the British and …
 
On June 18, 2020, in the case Department of Homeland Security v. Regents of the University of California, the Supreme Court held in a five-to-four decision that the reasoning the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) offered in support of its decision to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) initiative was inadequate and therefo…
 
Heather and Tom Frizzell discuss the July 31, 2020 First Circuit Court decision to overturn Dzhokhar "Jahar" Tsarnaev's death sentence. In this episode, we talk about the issues the defense won on, as well as the four biggest takeaways from the decision: Judge O'Toole's failure to properly vet jurors for bias during voir dire, the debate over failu…
 
More than 800,000 people filed new state unemployment claims last week, but job gains are way up, too. Today on the show: what churn in the labor market can tell us about this economy. Plus: Voting at arenas, wildfire insurance and why homeowners are better equipped for this recession than renters. The story about voting in arenas in this episode c…
 
Long before he’d start Netflix, consider selling it to Blockbuster for a song and get a 10-year head start in the streaming wars, Reed Hastings was getting coffee at a dot-com company. On today’s show, Hastings will tell us about Netflix’s path to dominance and where it’s going next. Plus: “Tenet’s” box office performance, the thousands of furlough…
 
For workers who have been at home all summer, many of whom lack AC, the heat this summer has been a bigger problem than the past. And it’s only getting worse with a record-breaking heat wave hitting California this Labor Day weekend. Electricity use has decreased overall during the pandemic, but residential energy use is up. Basically, workers — fo…
 
2020 has been a year of reflection, mourning and perspective. This Labor Day, we look back at the last major fiscal crisis in New York City before delving into the history and experiences of the “essential workers” who have kept the city running during the COVID pandemic. Reporter Jenny Casas gets into the gritty work and history of “New York’s Str…
 
This week we look at the ultimate legacy of King Philip's war. What had the entire thing meant? What were the short and long term gains? What about the losses? Finally, how does this conflict fit into the greater story of the colonies in the 17th century, and explain the events to come?Di Allen Ayers
 
Under normal circumstances, gaining 1.4 million jobs in August would have been incredible for this economy. But this isn’t any other August, and it comes a few months after the U.S. lost a full 15% of its jobs. On today’s show, we’ll look at the progress the country is making digging out of that hole. Plus: home refinancing, Campbell’s soup and the…
 
First-time unemployment claims were down last week to about 881,000, their lowest point since the pandemic started. But last week was also the first report since the Bureau of Labor Statistics changed how it does seasonal adjustment. That’s a formula the bureau uses so it doesn’t seem like the sky is falling when thousands of seasonal jobs disappea…
 
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