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Welcome to Tony Sam's Word of the Day Podcast! You may think you know what words mean, but YOU DON'T! Lucky for you, Tony Sam DOES. Tony Sam graduated magna cum laude from the Harvard School of Law and has been fascinated with the evolution of the English language as far back as he can remember. Currently serving as a Judge in the 23rd Circuit Court of Illinois, he finds time to learn more about words whenever he’s not walking his prized Labrador, Marshall. His other accolades include gradua ...
 
Voice medicine to soothe your soul, from freedom worker, poet, author, and spoken word artist Dr. Jaiya John. Bedtime bliss. Morning meditation. Daytime peace. Comfort. Calm. Soul food. Come, gather around the fire. Let me read for you... Books online wherever books hang out. Learn more at jaiyajohn.com.
 
World events viewed from a Biblical perspective. Day by day, bit by bit building a case that Bible prophecy is 100% accurate. The Bible is as relevant in these last days as in any previous time in history. If you would like to hear from a fellow student of the Divine Word of the God of Israel this podcast may prove itself worthwhile. http://welcomehome777.com/
 
Piers Langland is a mild mannered paint salesman with one burning passion. He aspires to be a famous author. Each November he looks forward to entering The National Novel Writer Month competition. To be a winner in NaNoWriMo he must write a 50,000 word novel in 30 days, a tall order for any writer. Turns out, it is an especially tall order for our hero. Join Piers as he struggles to choose a topic for his novel before he can begin his epic task. Vampires or space opera, romance or pulp ficti ...
 
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Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 31, 2021 is: dally • \DAL-ee\ • verb 1 a : to act playfully; especially : to play amorously b : to deal lightly : toy 2 a : to waste time b : linger, dawdle Examples: Alton has been dallying with the idea of starting a bakery. "Just as businesses that dallied too long before moving into the era of computin…
 
Laggard is an adjective that means the tendency to lag behind. It’s also a noun that refers to someone one lags behind. The exact origin of our word of the day is unclear, but we know the word ‘lag’ entered the English language somewhere around the early 16th century. To lag means to fall behind in movement or progress, so as a noun, a laggard is s…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 30, 2021 is: wherefore • \WAIR-for\ • adverb 1 : for what reason or purpose : why 2 : therefore Examples: "O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?" — William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, 1594-95 "According to The Blast, the legal filing said 'Wherefore, Petitioner requests an order of this court that t…
 
Picayune is an adjective that means petty or meaningless and a noun that refers to an insignificant person or thing. Our word of the day comes directly from French, where it refers to a 19th century copper coin. Because this coin had a fairly small value, the word picayune came to refer to something or someone who didn’t mean much. For example: I t…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 29, 2021 is: palaver • \puh-LAV-er\ • noun 1 a : a long discussion or meeting parley usually between persons of different cultures or levels of sophistication b : conference, discussion 2 a : idle talk b : misleading or beguiling speech Examples: Enough of this palaver. We have a lot to discuss. "[Adrian D…
 
Squee is a noun that means a delighted squeal and a verb that means to squeal. The origin of squee is unclear, but, as a noun it refers to a cry of delight. Here’s an example of squee used as a verb where it means ‘to squeal.” I was so happy when the Steelers won the Super bowl, people could hear me squee with joy from blocks away. That’s the kind …
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 28, 2021 is: bivouac • \BIV-uh-wak\ • verb 1 : to make a temporary encampment under little or no shelter 2 : to take shelter often temporarily 3 : to provide temporary quarters for Examples: The climbers bivouacked under the cliff's ledge. "Bivouacked in the middle of the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf—a five-ho…
 
Erumpent is an adjective that means bursting forth. Our word of the day comes from the Latin erumpen (air ROOM pen) which means ‘erupting.’ It’s mainly used to describe plants or some other form of vegetation that are growing from the ground. But it can also be used figuratively, for example: At that time in New York, it seemed a brand new culture …
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 27, 2021 is: jeremiad • \jair-uh-MYE-ud\ • noun : a prolonged lamentation or complaint; also : a cautionary or angry harangue Examples: The news story was a scathing jeremiad against the invasion of privacy on celebrities. "We can expect a volley of jeremiads against wind power, as perhaps half that fleet …
 
Felicitate is a verb that means to congratulate. The Latin word Felix (FAY licks) means ‘happy,’ and it gave birth to our word of the day which is mainly used as a synonym of the verb congratulate. Peter and I may have had our differences over the years, but I nonetheless felt compelled to congratulate him at the black belt ceremony. I felt that th…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 26, 2021 is: urbane • \er-BAYN\ • adjective : notably polite or polished in manner Examples: "When had my willful and boorish cousin turned into this urbane young artist greeting the guests at her opening reception?" wondered James. "Offstage, he could be sensitive or surly, charming or sometimes combative…
 
Jejune is an adjective that means naive or simplistic. Our word of the day comes from the Latin word jejunus (jay JOO noose) which means ‘without food.’ From this, the word later came to refer to opinions or thoughts that were ‘without intellectual nourishment.’ Here’s an example: Being a college junior with a love of philosophy can lend itself to …
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 25, 2021 is: hagiography • \hag-ee-AH-gruh-fee\ • noun 1 : biography of saints or venerated persons 2 : idealizing or idolizing biography Examples: "Music documentaries can veer into hagiography. That's not this story. It goes up and down, with constant left turns and surprises you don't expect." — Edgar W…
 
Scunner is a noun that refers to a strong dislike. The exact origin of scunner is unknown but we can trace it back to Late Middle English when it was first used to mean ‘shrink back with fear.’ More recently it refers an extreme aversion or dislike. Chris’ scunner of Spaghetti, linguini and garlic bread made no sense to me. After all, why own and o…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 24, 2021 is: lexical • \LEK-sih-kul\ • adjective 1 : of or relating to words or the vocabulary of a language as distinguished from its grammar and construction 2 : of or relating to a lexicon or to lexicography Examples: As stated in the catalog, the university's second-year language courses are designed t…
 
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