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Exploring inequality, abuse and oppression around the world, we hear from those directly involved in an issue, examine the structural context to find why rights abuse exists, and look for possible solutions. You can also read articles related to some of these episodes at the web site of The Upstream Journal! www.upstreamjournal.org. We are pleased to see that Human Rights Magazine is a top-rated human rights podcast at Feedspot. (https://blog.feedspot.com/human_rights_podcasts/)
 
RightsUp explores the big human rights issues of the day through interviews with experts, academics, practicing lawyers, activists and policy makers who are at the forefront of tackling the world's most difficult human rights questions. RightsUp is brought to you by the Oxford Human Rights Hub, based in the Law Faculty at the University of Oxford. Music for this podcast is by Rosemary Allmann. (This podcast is distributed under a CC by NC-SA 4.0 license.)
 
Hosted by Lantos Foundation President, Dr. Katrina Lantos Swett, The Keeper features in depth conversations about the most pressing matters of human rights and justice around the world and welcomes some of the most important human rights figures of our time as guests.The Keeper takes its name from the personal conviction of the Lantos Foundation's namesake Congressman Tom Lantos, fully lived out in his own life, that we have a moral and ethical obligation to be our brother and sister’s keepe ...
 
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Human Rights - Audio

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Human Rights - Audio

Center for Strategic and International Studies

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CSIS human rights research is led by the Human Rights Initiative (HRI). Launched in 2014, HRI promotes a proactive global human rights agenda that reinforces democratic values as a central component of a comprehensive foreign policy. It seeks to generate innovative solutions for government, civil society, and the private sector and works to integrate human rights priorities across U.S. foreign policy interests. In conjunction with the HRI program, CSIS experts from across programs also exami ...
 
A show about human rights coming to you every week from the Cambridge Centre of Governance and Human Rights. Tune in each week as our panel explores the impact of new technologies on human rights, joined by fascinating guests from the University of Cambridge and around the world. (All rights reserved, so to speak. Our theme song, "Relative Dimensions", was created by the artificial intelligence at JukeDeck.)
 
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was ratified in 1948 by the United Nations General Assembly. It defines the fundamental rights of individuals, and exhorts all governments to protect these rights. The UN has translated the document into over three hundred languages and dialects. This audiobook includes readings in 21 languages.
 
Human rights are basic rights and freedoms that belong to every one of us, no matter who we are or where we live. These rights are universal, indivisible, and interdependent. Because they apply to everyone, everywhere, and at all times.Our aim in Human Rights Sentinel is to highlight the issues that are not covered by the media or have been neglected by the international committee due to political, national, or international interests.
 
What is the human rights issue? Where is this human right issue occurring? Which human right article in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights does it violate? How does it violate this right? Is anything already being done to help correct this human rights issue? What? Why should your peers care about this human rights issue? What can you/your peers do to about this?
 
The battle for democracy will be fought one human rights issue at a time. In this biweekly podcast from the CSIS Human Rights Initiative, host Marti Flacks tackles current events with activists and policymakers at the center of global efforts to promote human rights and build stronger, more sustainable democracies. Share your feedback at humanrights@csis.org.
 
Podcasts produced by the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission. The Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission was established under statute on 1 November 2014 to protect and promote human rights and equality in Ireland, to promote a culture of respect for human rights, equality and intercultural understanding, to promote understanding and awareness of the importance of human rights and equality, and to work towards the elimination of human rights abuses and discrimination.
 
The International Code of Conduct for Private Security Service Providers' Association (ICoCA) is a multistakeholder initiative whose mission is to raise private industry security standards and promote the responsible provision of private security. During these podcasts ICoCA invites different perspectives on what the future holds for responsible private security that respects human rights and international humanitarian law. Music by www.bensound.com
 
Welcome to The Human Rights Podcast from the Irish Centre for Human Rights at the National University of Ireland, Galway. Here at the Centre, we are fortunate to be visited each year by an array of world-leading practitioners, researchers and policy-makers in the field of human rights and its associated disciplines. We also have a vibrant community at the ICHR and more broadly in NUI Galway of academic staff, postdoctoral and doctoral scholars, and postgraduate and undergraduate students foc ...
 
TIC TALKS is all about sport, inclusion and human rights. TIC (The Inclusion Club) interviews leading world practitioners in the field of sport and recreation, with a focus on the inclusion of people with disability in sport and active recreation programs. Learn about new programs, new ways of thinking and new approaches to inclusion issues. We also look at the similarities of inclusion across targeted populations, including Indigenous people, people from different cultural backgrounds and w ...
 
At the University of Chicago, research and teaching in human rights integrate exploration of the core questions of human dignity with critical examination of the institutions designed to promote and protect human rights in the contemporary world. The University of Chicago Human Rights Program is an initiative unique among its peers for the interdisciplinary focus its faculty and students bring to bear on these essential matters. The Distinguished Lecturer series creates space for dialogue be ...
 
Human Rights in Transit is a collaborative project that engages the ongoing and emerging tensions that are at the center of contemporary global existence. As people struggle for their lives as migrants, refugees, citizens, and indeed as humans, there is also a radical de-centering and even crisis of the human underway. From technology, bioscience, and environmental transformations, to deconolonial critiques of humanism, the category of the human and the future of the humanities, is deeply un ...
 
This two-day conference provided a forum for academics, practitioners and government representatives to evaluate the current debate and future shape of the post-2015 agenda from a human rights perspective. It was focused on both theoretical and practical aspects of integrating human rights in the post-2105 agenda, with a particular focus on poverty, environment and peace and security.
 
This rousing collection of videos portray the vibrant global movement of movements devoted to environmental health, justice, dignity, diversity, and democracy – to human rights and the rights of nature. It opposes the concentration of wealth and distribution of poverty. It augurs an ecologically literate, just civilization where taking care of nature means taking care of people – and taking care of people means taking care of nature. Since 1990, Bioneers has acted as a fertile hub of social ...
 
What are the differences between individual and minority rights? How did the League of Nations and United Nations attempt to address the topic of human rights? Right now, we define human rights as the rights to which all people are inherently entitled to as a result of being a human being. From the creation of the League of Nations in 1920 it’s been accepted that everyone should be protected under a set of natural or legal laws, but how has the definition of these rights changed since they w ...
 
The Palimpsest of Human Rights is an experimental spoken word production which combines verse interpretations of the prose writings of Martin Luther King, Mohandas Gandhi, and Henry Thoreau. The influence of new, temporally-bound ideas on succeeding generations is revealed in a continuous discourse. The physical idea of a palimpsest (writing over the top of an existing text in a manuscript) is here extended to an aural experience. When the texts are read aloud, one over the top of another, t ...
 
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show series
 
There are Bethesda, MD residents who live atop of and park their cars on a Black American cemetery that has existed for more than a century. Human Rights and Justice host Nkechi Taifa interviews members of the Bethesda African Cemetery Coalition about their fight against government and big business on behalf of our departed ancestors! Featured gues…
 
Esther Dingemans is an expert in programmes that respond to conflict-related sexual violence. She worked for several years in humanitarian programmes on sexual and gender-based violence in several countries in Africa and the Middle East. She is the executive director at the Global Survivors Fund and the Mukwege Foundation. In this episode, she was …
 
In this episode, we speak to Justice Steven Majiedt of the Constitutional Court of South Africa on the unique history of South African constitutionalism, whether the constitution can bring about transformation and the future of socio-economic rights protection in light of COVID and the cost-of-living crisis.…
 
What is the best way to achieve societal harmony in a place in which groups of people with different identities are living together. Should minority groups be given exemptions from general policies and laws or is it better to say majority privilege should be removed by finding solutions in which the law applies equally to the minority and the major…
 
The Keeper’s new Sports & Rights season kicks off with something a little different – a joint episode hosted by Dr. Katrina Lantos Swett and Tim Horgan, Executive Director of the World Affairs Council of New Hampshire and host of the Global in the Granite State podcast. Katrina and Tim join forces for a dynamic conversation about the complex and of…
 
Host Nkechi Taifa interviews Dr. Akmal Muwwakkil, an herbalist and healer with a Ph.D. in Nutrition. He is a licensed acupuncturist, massage therapist, auricular detoxification expert, Tui Na specialist and a QiGong master. He is an author, master teacher, and coach. The wide-ranging discussion included mental health, enslavement, violence, negativ…
 
Human Rights and Justice host Nkechi Taifa features a book talk with author, activist, scholar Bernard Demczuk, PhD., discussing his novel “Mame’s Spirit: Reparations and Romance, An Afro-Futurist Crime-Mystery Love-Story Re-Mixed with Reparations, Righteousness and West African Spirituality." Mame’s Spirit helps to raise this vital question: How s…
 
Episode 9 of Human Rights and Justice features interviews with two Powerhouse Commentators - Howard University’s Professor Greg Carr and Black Voters Matter co-founder LaTosha Brown. They discuss with host Nkechi Taifa the importance of voting in the upcoming mid-term elections and what’s at stake, concluding with the mantras, “WE WILL NOT BLACK DO…
 
For this episode in the Pathways to Peace series, the focus is on the particular impact of violence and insecurity on women and girls. My guest is Reem Alsalem who, for 17 years until 2016, worked with the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, and then became an independent consultant in humanitarian action and refugee protection. She is now the UN Sp…
 
The Kafala system is a form of worker sponsorship that allows private citizens and companies almost total control over the employment and immigration status of migrant workers. Lebanon has some 250,000 migrant domestic workers, most of them women from Africa and Asia. The labour laws do not provide them protections that other workers have, like a m…
 
Anthropological Witness: Lessons from the Khmer Rouge Tribunal (Cornell UP, 2022) tells the story of Alexander Laban Hinton's encounter with an accused architect of genocide and, more broadly, Hinton's attempt to navigate the promises and perils of expert testimony. In March 2016, Hinton served as an expert witness at the Extraordinary Chambers in …
 
Donald Bloxham and Dirk Moses have offered us a unique opportunity--a chance to see authors and editors in conversation with each other and themselves about the state and nature of Genocide Studies. Genocide: Key Themes (Oxford University Press, 2022) emerged out of an effort to update and slim down their earlier, larger volume The Oxford Handbook …
 
Should everyone have privacy in their personal lives? Can privacy exist in a public place? Is there a right to be left alone, even in the United States? The battle between an individual’s right to privacy and the public’s right to know has been fought for centuries. You may be surprised to realize that the original framers were sensitive to the imp…
 
How do states coerce citizens into compliance while simultaneously minimizing backlash? In Outsourcing Repression: Everyday State Power in Contemporary China (Oxford UP, 2020), Lynette H. Ong examines how the Chinese state engages nonstate actors, from violent street gangsters to nonviolent grassroots brokers, to coerce and mobilize the masses for …
 
Experimentation on animals—particularly humans—is often assumed to be a uniquely modern phenomenon. But the ideas and attitudes that encourage biological and medical scientists to experiment on living creatures date from the earliest expressions of Western thought. In Experimenting with Humans and Animals: From Aristotle to CRISPR (Johns Hopkins UP…
 
The contemporary internet's de facto business model is one of surveillance. Browser cookies follow us around the web, Amazon targets us with eerily prescient ads, Facebook and Google read our messages and analyze our patterns, and apps record our every move. In Profit over Privacy: How Surveillance Advertising Conquered the Internet (U Minnesota Pr…
 
In March 2022 the U.S. government announced its determination that genocide was committed by the Myanmar military against Rohingya communities in Myanmar’s Rakhine State in 2017. What will this mean for the roughly one million Rohingya refugees living in neighboring countries, for Rohingya IDPs in Rakhine, and for post-coup Myanmar? In this episode…
 
The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 officially ended the explicit prejudice in American immigration policy that began with the 1790 restriction on naturalization to free White persons of “good character.” By the 1980s, the rest of the Anglo-European world had followed suit, purging discriminatory language from their immigration laws and ach…
 
In February 2021, Myanmar military leaders removed the democratically elected party from power and took control of the government. In the year following, at least 1,700 civilians, including children, have been killed by the junta forces and some 10,000 arrested. Media outlets have been closed, and journalists arrested, beaten and tortured. Some hav…
 
There are currently a record-setting number of forcibly displaced persons in the world. This number continues to rise as solutions to alleviate humanitarian catastrophes of large-scale violence and displacement continue to fail. The likelihood of the displaced returning to their homes is becoming increasingly unlikely. In many cases, their homes ha…
 
Human Rights and Justice host Nkechi Taifa interviews Dr. Clarence Lusane, Interim Chair of the Political Science Department and Director of International Affairs at Howard University, who was recently confirmed as U.S. Independent Expert to the European Commission Against Racism and Intolerance. Dr. Lusane discusses people of African descent who s…
 
Delegating Responsibility: International Cooperation on Migration in the European Union (U Michigan Press, 2022) explores the politics of migration in the European Union and explains how the EU responded to the 2015–17 refugee crisis. Based on 86 interviews and fieldwork in Greece and Italy, Nicholas R. Micinski proposes a new theory of internation…
 
Lawless elements are ascendant in Mexico, as evidenced by the operations of criminal cartels engaged in human and drug trafficking, often with the active support or acquiescence of government actors. The sharp increase in the number of victims of homicide, disappearances and torture over the past decade is unparalleled in the country's recent histo…
 
The world's largest rainforest is in trouble. Trees are being cut down at the fastest rate in years, for their wood and to clear the ground for crops supplying the global food industry. 75% of the forest is under stress with this level of deforestation, and with climate change impacts the trees take longer to recover from droughts and there are mor…
 
Does torture "work?" Can controversial techniques such as waterboarding extract crucial and reliable intelligence? Since 9/11, this question has been angrily debated in the halls of power and the court of public opinion. In Anatomy of Torture (Cornell UP, 2022), Ron E. Hassner mines the archives of the Spanish Inquisition to propose an answer that …
 
Micha Odenheimer is the founder and director of Tevel B’Zedek, an Israeli NGO that aims to create Israeli and Jewish leadership passionately engaged in Tikkun Olam – fixing the world – locally and globally. Tevel B’Zedek provides community development support for sustainable agriculture in remote rural areas. Odenheimer is an activist and former jo…
 
An alienated society divided into groups and classes suspicious of one another does not pose an especially great problem for an authoritarian regime that does not legitimize itself through fair elections. In contrast, democratic institutions presuppose a consensus about obeying common “rules of the game” and rely on a culture of trust and reciproci…
 
Dr Lucy Series Deprivations of Liberty in The Shadows of the Institution (Bristol University Press, 2022) is one that I have long been looking forward to reading, and it did not disappoint. Series provides a rich historical and socio-legal context to bring new understanding of the post-carceral era, and the legacies of the institutions which contin…
 
Amphibious Subjects: Sasso and the Contested Politics of Queer Self-Making in Neoliberal Ghana (University of California Press, 2022) is an ethnographic study of a community of self-identified effeminate men--known in local parlance as sasso--residing in coastal Jamestown, a suburb of Accra, Ghana's capital. Drawing on the Ghanaian philosopher Kwam…
 
On October 22-25, 2021 the Spirit of Mandela Coalition hosted an International Tribunal charging the U.S. with human rights abuses against Black, Brown and Indigenous Peoples before a panel of nine jurists. This 2021 Tribunal stood on the shoulders of the 1951 Petition We Charge Genocide: The Crime of Government Against the Negro People,” submitted…
 
What happens to the cultural politics of human rights when atrocities are rendered calculable, abuses are transformed into data, and victims become vectors? As human rights organizations have increasingly embraced information technologies this ‘datafication’ of rights has become both a reality and a pressing concern, one inextricably tangled up wit…
 
In Global Norms and Local Action: The Campaigns to End Violence against Women in Africa (Oxford UP, 2020), Peace A. Medie studies the domestic implementation of international norms by examining how and why two post-conflict states in Africa, Liberia and Côte d'Ivoire, have differed in their responses to rape and domestic violence. Specifically, she…
 
In Episode 6 of Human Rights and Justice, host Nkechi Taifa interviews Mr. Darron Patterson, direct descendant of the last known Africans to be illegally transported to the U.S. in the belly of the slave ship Clotilda, landing in Mobile, Alabama in 1859, whose ancestors formed the community of AfricaTown, and Dr. Afia Zakiya - newly installed first…
 
People who come to Canada as refugees or migrants without legal status can be held indefinitely in detention centers or provincial jails. They may not have committed an offense and there is no trial, but they are treated as though they are criminals. Find out more in the new podcast episode by Serra Hasiloglu. Human Rights Magazine is produced by T…
 
In March of 2022 the U.S. government announced its determination that genocide was committed by the Myanmar military against Rohingya communities in Myanmar’s Rakhine State in 2017. What will this mean for the roughly one million Rohingya refugees living in neighboring countries, for Rohingya IDPs in Rakhine State, and for post-coup Myanmar? In thi…
 
Nkechi Taifa’s Human Rights and Justice Episode 5 features Julia Wright joining in from Paris, France. She is an esteemed poet and essayist, and daughter of legendary author & expatriate Richard Wright (Native Son, Black Boy). Julia reflects on her life, along with her Great-Uncle’s 1916 lynching, the Elaine Arkansas 1919 Massacre, upcoming Emmett …
 
Warzones are sometimes described as lawless, but this is rarely the case. Armed insurgents often replace the state as the provider of law and justice in areas under their authority. Based on extensive fieldwork, Rebel Courts: The Administration of Justice by Armed Insurgents (Oxford University Press, 2021) by Dr. Réne Provost offers a compelling an…
 
A Critical Theory of Police Power: The Fabrication of Social Order (Verso, 2021) offers a critical look at policing and the power of the state, examining the relationship between our ideas of order and wider social and political issues. First published in 2000, this new edition of Mark Neocleous' influential book features a new introduction which h…
 
Transitional justice – the act of reckoning with a former authoritarian regime after it has ceased to exist – has direct implications for democratic processes. Mechanisms of transitional justice have the power to influence who decides to go into politics, can shape politicians' behavior while in office, and can affect how politicians delegate polic…
 
For nearly two decades, the United States devoted more than $2 billion towards democracy promotion in the Middle East with seemingly little impact. To understand the limited impact of this aid and the decision of authoritarian regimes to allow democracy programs whose ultimate aim is to challenge the power of such regimes, Marketing Democracy: The …
 
On March 4th, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln delivered his Second Inaugural Address. He considered it his “greatest speech” and his “best effort." Join Academy Award-winning actor Richard Dreyfuss and best-selling Lincoln biographer Dr. Ronald C. White for a fascinating look at the Second Inaugural Address. Through a powerful, fascinating voyage o…
 
Episode 4 features Human Rights & Justice host Nkechi Taifa broadcasting live from the Congressional Black Caucus’ Sept 28-Oct 2, 2022 Conference at the DC Convention Center. Stopping by to give shout-outs and commentary include CBCF President and CEO Nicole Austin-Hillery; the Sentencing Project's Nicole Porter; Patrice Sulton from the DC Justice …
 
Chitranshul Sinha is an advocate on record of the Supreme Court of India and a partner in Dua Associates, Advocates and Solicitors, who primarily practises in the courts of New Delhi. He occasionally writes articles for leading publications on topics related to law. The Indian Penal Code was formulated in 1860, three years after the first Indian re…
 
In Episode 3, Host Nkechi Taifa discusses her article, “Why the Woman King Made Me Feel Like a Queen.” She also reflects on an uncomfortable issue, that prisoners of war taken aboard The Clotilda, the last known slave ship to illegally enter US shores in 1860, were captured by the Agogie women warriors on behalf of the Kingdom of Dahomey and then s…
 
Based on fieldwork among state officials, NGOs, politicians, and activists in Costa Rica and Brazil, A Future History of Water (Duke UP, 2019) traces the unspectacular work necessary to make water access a human right and a human right something different from a commodity. Andrea Ballestero shows how these ephemeral distinctions are made through fo…
 
In 1948, the United Nations presented a document outlining human rights for every person in the world. This document was called the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. This document has inspired human rights movements around the globe and gave the world something tangible to strive for. Mathias Risse is the Lucius Littauer Professor of Philosoph…
 
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